counterfactual

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coun·ter·fac·tu·al

 (koun′tər-făk′cho͞o-əl)
adj.
Running contrary to the facts: "Cold war historiography vividly illustrates how the selection of the counterfactual question to be asked generally anticipates the desired answer" (Timothy Garton Ash).

coun′ter·fac′tu·al n.

counterfactual

(ˌkauntəˈfæktʃʊəl) logic
adj
(Logic) expressing what has not happened but could, would, or might under differing conditions
n
(Logic) a conditional statement in which the first clause is a past tense subjunctive statement expressing something contrary to fact, as in: if she had hurried she would have caught the bus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.counterfactual - going counter to the facts (usually as a hypothesis)
conditional - imposing or depending on or containing a condition; "conditional acceptance of the terms"; "lent conditional support"; "the conditional sale will not be complete until the full purchase price is paid"

counterfactual

adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
KEY WORDS: contrastivism, counterfactual conditional, general causation, singular causation, causal claim
The counterfactual conditional examples are hardly discussed.
Campbell on causal relations in science, the interpretation of quantum phenomena, and David Lewis and the counterfactual conditional view.
Anyone who accepts that names can function as the grammatical subjects of counterfactual conditional sentences such as "Had George Bush born in England, he would not have been the president of the United States", must accept this assumption.
In the following sections we are going to focus on a review of conditional sentences-the past hypothetical/ counterfactual conditional in particular-and on the research study and its results.
A theory can be evaluated by counterfactual conditional reasoning.
is meant to stand for a counterfactual conditional.
In Chapter I Carroll develops his important thesis that the nomic concepts (lawhood, causation, chance, the counterfactual conditional, and disposition) are central to our conceptual scheme.
As noted in the previous section, "wish" and "regret" implicate the counterfactual conditional reasoning: "I know this is not the case, but is it really not the case?
According to our Leibnizian semantics, a counterfactual conditional A [square][right arrow] B is true just in case B is true in the closest world in which A is true.
Comparing the frequency of inferences between adults and children, differences were observed only for the factual conditional, not for the counterfactual conditional.