counter-insurgency

(redirected from Counterguerrilla)

counter-insurgency

Those military, paramilitary, political, economic, psychological, and civic actions taken to defeat insurgency.
Translations

counter-insurgency

[ˈkaʊntərɪnˈsɜːdʒənsɪ] Nmedidas fpl antiinsurrectivas
References in periodicals archive ?
The NPA, meanwhile, has accused the AFP earlier this month that despite the military's supposed unilateral ceasefire, "military and police units observed no holidays and showed no letup in the conduct of their counterguerrilla operations and militarization of communities.
5) These attacks--eventually recognized as the most successful guerrilla movement in occupied Europe--created sufficient concern within the German government that counterguerrilla operations were conducted to address the threat.
Olson presents The Notorious Isaac Earl and His Scouts: Union Soldiers, Prisoners, Spies, an extraordinary study of a counterguerrilla unit of Union soldiers, led by Isaac Earl, a bold lieutenant from Wisconsin.
The report states the rebels should fight the security forces by analysing changes in their counter- insurgency and counterguerrilla warfare operations and by identifying their " weaknesses".
For the counterguerrilla force, the key to success is the ability to project sufficient power over distance and conduct a successful pursuit.
Nineteenth and 20th century counterguerrilla operations laid the foundations for modem counterinsurgency doctrine by integrating HUMINT, PSYOP, and CMO into a common warfighting continuum.
Adams is apolitical military strategist with more than 30 years of experience in all forms of operations other than war, including counterguerrilla operations in Vietnam, humanitarian assistance in Haiti, counterdrug missions in South America, and peace operations in Bosnia.
The Greyhound force, an elite anti-Maoist commando unit, was raised beginning in 1987 from within the Andhra Pradesh police to conduct small unit counterguerrilla offensives against Naxalite insurgents.
Afterward, however, counterguerrilla operations did not fare so well.
Tierney suggests that one of the most important factors that leads to success in a guerrilla or counterguerrilla war is knowledge of the local landscape.
Such an open counterguerrilla strategy could not have been possible without the explicit consent and approval of the president.
The largest of these involved a FARC force of eight battalion equivalents engaged by an equal number of COLAR counterguerrilla battalions (BCG).