masque

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masque

also mask  (măsk)
n.
1. A dramatic entertainment, usually performed by masked players representing mythological or allegorical figures, that was popular in England in the 1500s and early 1600s.
2. A dramatic verse composition written for such an entertainment.

[French; see mask.]

masque

(mɑːsk) or

mask

n
1. (Theatre) a dramatic entertainment of the 16th to 17th centuries in England, consisting of pantomime, dancing, dialogue, and song, often performed at court
2. (Theatre) the words and music written for a masque
3. (Clothing & Fashion) short for masquerade
[C16: variant of mask]

masque

or mask

(mæsk, mɑsk)

n.
1. an elaborate court entertainment in England in the 16th and 17th centuries combining pantomime, dialogue, music, singing, dancing, and mechanical effects.
2. a dramatic composition for such entertainment.
[1505–15; < Middle French]

masque

A typical European Renaissance dramatic form, with actors using masks and costumes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.masque - a party of guests wearing costumes and masksmasque - a party of guests wearing costumes and masks
fancy-dress ball, masked ball, masquerade ball - a ball at which guests wear costumes and masks
party - a group of people gathered together for pleasure; "she joined the party after dinner"
Translations

masque

[mɑːsk] Nmascarada f

masque

nMaskenspiel nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Part II, "Stage of Girlhood," shifts the analysis from dramatic representations of girlhood to girls as performers themselves in the Jacobean and Caroline court masque.
And in Stuart England, girls were an important part of the evolving genre of the court masque.
The other works reviewed in this issue represent a wide range of approaches to early performance cultures, covering topics as diverse as medieval staging conventions, the politics of the court masque, manuscript cultures of extracting, and the figure of the stage clown.
She memorably describes the play as a "series of competing staged fictions" (75) and is right, I think, to assert the ways in which it deploys the court masque as a "structural, thematic, and imaginative source" (75), though I am less convinced by her claims for how unusual Massinger is in doing so at this time.
On the other hand, the lavish court masque, intended to glorify the monarchy, fell out of favor.
Greenberg discusses images derived from evolving property law, Cynthia Saenz analyzes Traherne's views on language, and Carol Ann Johnston suggests a debt to the culture of the court masque.
This attention to the nuance of colour raises an interesting question about if, when, and how the stage made visual distinctions that reflected the culture's certain knowledge of skin colour difference (notwithstanding the stage's conflation of 'Negroes and Moors', as Stephen Orgel points out in 'Marginal Jonson', The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, Cambridge, 1998, 158).
95) (Paul Innes); the impact of Western forms of mimetic realism, especially in performances of Shakespeare, on the dramatic art of colonial and postcolonial India (Poonam Trivedi); and the court masque as a means of constructing the identity of the social elite by 'the constant juxtaposition of representations of popular and high culture' (p.
Livia's crowning moment is when she is lowered from the heights on a hoist to play the part of Juno in a court masque but was Penelope nervous of the drop?
9) However, besides aiming at staging constant and stable political power, by the political content, the court masque was simultaneously directed to history and time.
As the first court masque to employ blackface pageantry, and because the Queen and other assertive, self-assured ladies of her court blackened themselves with such theatrical cosmetics, the production of The Masque of Blackness evoked great, "aesthetic" complaints, complaints that were as much about misogyny and empire as they were about newer ideas informing eugenic racism.