masque

(redirected from Court masques)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Court masques: Ben Jonson

masque

also mask  (măsk)
n.
1. A dramatic entertainment, usually performed by masked players representing mythological or allegorical figures, that was popular in England in the 1500s and early 1600s.
2. A dramatic verse composition written for such an entertainment.

[French; see mask.]

masque

(mɑːsk) or

mask

n
1. (Theatre) a dramatic entertainment of the 16th to 17th centuries in England, consisting of pantomime, dancing, dialogue, and song, often performed at court
2. (Theatre) the words and music written for a masque
3. (Clothing & Fashion) short for masquerade
[C16: variant of mask]

masque

or mask

(mæsk, mɑsk)

n.
1. an elaborate court entertainment in England in the 16th and 17th centuries combining pantomime, dialogue, music, singing, dancing, and mechanical effects.
2. a dramatic composition for such entertainment.
[1505–15; < Middle French]

masque

A typical European Renaissance dramatic form, with actors using masks and costumes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.masque - a party of guests wearing costumes and masksmasque - a party of guests wearing costumes and masks
fancy-dress ball, masked ball, masquerade ball - a ball at which guests wear costumes and masks
party - a group of people gathered together for pleasure; "she joined the party after dinner"
Translations

masque

[mɑːsk] Nmascarada f

masque

nMaskenspiel nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 6 concerns Milton's Comus, which, Williams suggests, also reflects upon girls as performers in court masques.
Besides providing evidence of girls as speakers in medieval religious drama, Tudor civic pageantry, Elizabethan entertainments, and Stuart court masques, what also matters about the girl masquer is her creation of an arresting spectacle through dance, music, and costume.
The picture collection was long gone by the time that Anne and her sister Mary grew up, but the fashion for court masques remained.
Court masques, however, even though the masquers are dumb and the text is often minimal, contain many other constituent elements, just as important as the final dancing, which 'speak' and convey meaning.
In court masques and other performances, Welsford argues that the "underlying intention [was that] .
Only specialists read the court masques upon which he so prided himself, and, except for a small number of anthologized pieces, the same is true of his poetry.
Shedding new light on that quintessential Tudor emblem, Dugan reveals how the distillation of damask rose gave the monarch a signature fragrance, which projected a majestic presence, particularly at court masques, as well as a sovereign absence when worn by his amours.
In chapter 2, she moves onto the category of "masques-within-plays" Noting that Massinger (like Shakespeare) wrote no official court masques, she indicates that he was nevertheless fascinated by the form.
By combining traditional sources, such as account books, with an examination of the ways in which Henrietta allowed herself to be depicted in her many portraits as well as her patronage of court masques and devotional music, a more complex image of the queen emerges, one in which she is aware of the political implications of her actions and endeavors to direct the results.
The court masques get noticed; and then Wells concludes with this bracing claim: Jonson "is both one of the most fascinatingly complex characters and the most complete man of letters in the whole of British literature" (166).
The court masques were preserved from oblivion by the antiquary John Nichols, whose Progresses, Processions, and Magnificent Festivities of James I had an enduring effect on the understanding of early modern court culture.