Coventry


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Cov·en·try 1

 (kŭv′ĭn-trē)
A city of central England east-southeast of Birmingham. Famous as the home of Lady Godiva in the 11th century, Coventry was severely damaged in air raids during World War II (November 1940).

Cov·en·try 2

 (kŭv′ən-trē)
n.
A state of ostracism or exile: "It's not that smoke-filled rooms are back; smokers huddle in Coventry these days" (Flora Lewis).

[After Coventry1England (possibly from the sending of Royalist prisoners there during the English Civil War).]

Coventry

(ˈkɒvəntrɪ)
n
1. (Placename) a city in central England, in Coventry unitary authority, West Midlands: devastated in World War II; modern cathedral (1954–62); industrial centre, esp for motor vehicles; two universities (1965, 1992). Pop: 303 475 (2001)
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a unitary authority in central England, in West Midlands. Pop: 305 000 (2003 est). Area: 97 sq km (37 sq miles)
3. send to Coventry to ostracize or ignore

Cov•en•try

(ˈkʌv ən tri, ˈkɒv-)

n.
a city in West Midlands, in central England. 337,000.
Idioms:
send to Coventry, to ostracize.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Coventry - the state of being banished or ostracized (excluded from society by general consent)Coventry - the state of being banished or ostracized (excluded from society by general consent); "the association should get rid of its elderly members--not by euthanasia, of course, but by Coventry"
exclusion - the state of being excluded
2.Coventry - an industrial city in central England; devastated by air raids during World War II; remembered as the home of Lady Godiva in the 11th century
England - a division of the United Kingdom
Translations

Coventry

[ˈkɒvəntrɪ] N to send sb to Coventry (Brit) → hacer el vacío a algn

Coventry

[ˈkɒvəntri] n
to send sb to Coventry (= ostracize) → mettre qn en quarantaine

Coventry

n to send somebody to Coventry (Brit inf) → jdn schneiden (inf)

Coventry

[ˈkɒvntrɪ] n to send sb to Coventry (fig) → dare l'ostracismo a qn
References in classic literature ?
For a stake of one sovereign he undertook to run all the way to Coventry and back, a distance of something more than forty miles.
Polonius, of Coventry Street, and that gentleman never applied for their restoration, but they retired into a little private repository, in an old desk, which Amelia Sedley had given her years and years ago, and in which Becky kept a number of useful and, perhaps, valuable things, about which her husband knew nothing.
These are the York, the Chester, the Wakefield, and the Coventry cycles.
When they stopped to change at Coventry, the steam ascended from the horses in such clouds as wholly to obscure the hostler, whose voice was however heard to declare from the mist, that he expected the first gold medal from the Humane Society on their next distribution of rewards, for taking the postboy's hat off; the water descending from the brim of which, the invisible gentleman declared, must have drowned him (the postboy), but for his great presence of mind in tearing it promptly from his head, and drying the gasping man's countenance with a wisp of straw.
You are the Hand they have sent to Coventry, I mean?
She was brought up a Methodist, and during her girlhood was fervently evangelical, in the manner of Dinah Morris in 'Adam Bede'; but moving to Coventry she fell under the influence of some rationalistic acquaintances who led her to adopt the scientific Positivism of the French philosopher Comte.
During the business talk which had just come to an end this girl had been making her way up the side street which forms a short cut between Coventry Street and the Bandolero, and several admirers of feminine beauty who happened to be using the same route had almost dislocated their necks looking after her.
Mell said - seemed to send me to Coventry by general acclamation, and to cry out, each in his own way, 'Take care of him.
My father had a small factory at Coventry, which he enlarged at the time of the invention of bicycling.
COVENTRY lost out in yet another last-heat decider as Wednesfield Dragons snatched a 91-85 decision at Hearsall Common.
Although $720 million sounds like a lot, Bruce Coventry, president and CEO of GEMA, says the amount of total investment at the plant is nearly 50% less than a typical powertrain plant of its size and output.
The advent of institutional funding should virtually eliminate the scams and elevate the industry's image, said Alan Buerger, chief executive officer and co-founder of Coventry First, a settlement broker in Fort Washington, Pa.

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