cowpox

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Related to Cowpox virus: smallpox virus, Monkeypox virus, vaccinia virus

cow·pox

 (kou′pŏks′)
n.
A mild contagious skin disease of cattle, usually affecting the udder, that is caused by a virus and characterized by the eruption of a pustular rash. When the virus is transmitted to humans, as by vaccination, it can confer immunity to smallpox. Also called vaccinia.

cowpox

(ˈkaʊˌpɒks)
n
(Veterinary Science) a contagious viral disease of cows characterized by vesicles on the skin, esp on the teats and udder. Inoculation of humans with this virus provides temporary immunity to smallpox. It can be transmitted to other species, esp cats

cow•pox

(ˈkaʊˌpɒks)

n.
a mild disease of cattle, now rare, characterized by a pustular rash on the teats and udder, caused by a poxvirus that was formerly used for smallpox vaccinations.
[1790–1800]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cowpox - a viral disease of cattle causing a mild skin disease affecting the udder; formerly used to inoculate humans against smallpox
pox - a contagious disease characterized by purulent skin eruptions that may leave pock marks
animal disease - a disease that typically does not affect human beings
Translations

cowpox

[ˈkaʊpɒks] Nvacuna f

cowpox

[ˈkaʊˌpɒks] nvaiolo bovino
References in periodicals archive ?
Edward Jenner used the cowpox virus to shield us from smallpox.
Such vaccinations of the mild, bovine cowpox virus immunized humans from smallpox, then a leading cause of disfiguring illness and death.
Cowpox virus has been shown to transmit from pet rats to humans (Campe et al.
The new study employs a partially disabled cowpox virus dubbed JX-594 that does not produce full-blown symptoms of the skin disease.
The viruses are the same cowpox virus that forms the basis of the smallpox vaccine and a bird virus called fowlpox.
Devastated staff said the male and female cubs died last month from the cowpox virus.
Cowpox virus was useful because it enabled smallpox virus to be tackled.
Chapters 1 and 2 discuss previous methods used to prevent smallpox and how Edward Jenner demonstrated that a cowpox virus, transmitted through a human being, could retain its capacity to immunize against smallpox.
Variola virus and the closely related cowpox virus (CPV) [3], vaccinia virus (VV), and monkeypox virus (MKP) can all infect humans and are classified in the genus Orthopoxvirus.
Edward Jenner's inoculation of people with the much less deadly cowpox virus to protect against deadly smallpox because he noticed that milkmaids, who had had cowpox, did not contract smallpox.
In 1796 Edward Jenner began vaccinating people with the much safer cowpox virus after observing that milkmaids experienced mild infections of cowpox from their exposure to cattle, but never contracted smallpox.