cowslip

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cow·slip

 (kou′slĭp′)
n.
1. A Eurasian primrose (Primula veris) having fragrant yellow flowers, widely cultivated as an ornamental and long used in herbal medicine.

[Middle English cowslyppe, from Old English cūslyppe : , cow; see gwou- in Indo-European roots + slypa, slime; see sleubh- in Indo-European roots.]

cowslip

(ˈkaʊˌslɪp)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: paigle a primrose, Primula veris, native to temperate regions of the Old World, having fragrant yellow flowers
2. (Plants) US and Canadian another name for marsh marigold
[Old English cūslyppe; see cow1, slip3]

cow•slip

(ˈkaʊ slɪp)

n.
1. an English primrose, Primula veris, having fragrant yellow flowers.
2. the marsh marigold.
[before 1000; Middle English cowslyppe, Old English cūslyppe= cow1 + slyppe, slypa slime; see slip3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cowslip - early spring flower common in British isles having fragrant yellow or sometimes purple flowerscowslip - early spring flower common in British isles having fragrant yellow or sometimes purple flowers
primrose, primula - any of numerous short-stemmed plants of the genus Primula having tufted basal leaves and showy flowers clustered in umbels or heads
2.cowslip - swamp plant of Europe and North America having bright yellow flowers resembling buttercupscowslip - swamp plant of Europe and North America having bright yellow flowers resembling buttercups
Caltha, genus Caltha - a genus of Caltha
bog plant, marsh plant, swamp plant - a semiaquatic plant that grows in soft wet land; most are monocots: sedge, sphagnum, grasses, cattails, etc; possibly heath
Translations
petrklíčprvosenka jarní
aurículabelloritacaléndula acuáticacalta palustreclavelina
tavaszi kankalin

cowslip

[ˈkaʊslɪp] N (Bot) → primavera f, prímula f

cowslip

[ˈkaʊslɪp] nfleur f de coucou, coucou m

cowslip

[ˈkaʊˌslɪp] n (Bot) → primula odorosa
References in classic literature ?
Among the grasses carpeting the ground were pretty buttercups and cowslips and marigolds.
Fanny let the dress lie in her lap a minute as she absently picked at the fringe, smiling to herself over the happy time when she wore it last and Sydney said she only needed cowslips in her lap to look like spring.
Cowslip, during the autumn, had either the measles, or some eruption that looked very much like it, but was hardly sick a day.
I wish there were any likelihood of my soon seeing Primrose, Periwinkle, Dandelion, Sweet Fern, Clover Plantain, Huckleberry, Milkweed, Cowslip, Buttercup, Blue Eye, and Squash Blossom again.
Rosebud, if a Cowslip opens three leaves in one day and four the next, how many rosy leaves will there be when the whole flower has bloomed?
Then Eva saw how, on large, white leaves, the Fairies learned to imitate the lovely colors, and with tiny brushes to brighten the blush on the anemone's cheek, to deepen the blue of the violet's eye, and add new light to the golden cowslip.
There's the dessert,--nuts, you know, and cowslip wine.
His good nature had taken off the keenest edge of her suffering, and nuts with cowslip wine began to assert their legitimate influence.
They have real glasses and real wine of three kinds, namely, blackthorn wine, berberris wine, and cowslip wine, and the Queen pours out, but the bottles are so heavy that she just pretends to pour out.
Bouncer laughed; and pressed Tommy Brock to come inside, to taste a slice of seed-cake and "a glass of my daughter Flopsy's cowslip wine.
Columbine and Ladysmock, Marjoram and Wild Basil, the Cowslip and the Flower-de-luce, the Daffodil and the Clove-Pink bloomed or blossomed in their proper order as the months went by, one flower taking another flower's place, so that there were always beautiful things to look at, and pleasant odours to smell.
Moreover, as Gartner during several years repeatedly crossed the primrose and cowslip, which we have such good reason to believe to be varieties, and only once or twice succeeded in getting fertile seed; as he found the common red and blue pimpernels (Anagallis arvensis and coerulea), which the best botanists rank as varieties, absolutely sterile together; and as he came to the same conclusion in several other analogous cases; it seems to me that we may well be permitted to doubt whether many other species are really so sterile, when intercrossed, as Gartner believes.