crashing

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crash·ing

 (krăsh′ĭng)
adj.
Total; absolute: a crashing bore.

crashing

(ˈkræʃɪŋ)
adj
(prenominal) informal (intensifier) (esp in the phrase a crashing bore)

crash•ing

(ˈkræʃ ɪŋ)

adj.
1. absolute; complete: a crashing bore.
2. superlative; exceptional.
[1925–30]
crash′ing•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.crashing - informal intensifierscrashing - informal intensifiers; "what a bally (or blinking) nuisance"; "a bloody fool"; "a crashing bore"; "you flaming idiot"
unmitigated - not diminished or moderated in intensity or severity; sometimes used as an intensifier; "unmitigated suffering"; "an unmitigated horror"; "an unmitigated lie"

crashing

adjective
Translations

crashing

(o.f.) [ˈkræʃɪŋ] ADJ a crashing boreuna paliza, un muermo

crashing

adj (dated inf) he’s/it’s a crashing boreer/es ist fürchterlich or zum Einschlafen langweilig (inf)

crashing

[ˈkræʃɪŋ] adj (fam) (old) it's/he's a crashing boreè tremendamente noioso, è di una noia mortale
References in classic literature ?
Then it came out upon the other side, and there were more crashings and clatterings, and over it was flopped, like a pancake on a gridiron, and seized again and rushed back at you through another squeezer.
Then the trees closed up again, and they went on and up, with trumpetings and crashings, and the sound of breaking branches on every side of them.
One day the Countrymen noticed that the Mountains were in labour; smoke came out of their summits, the earth was quaking at their feet, trees were crashing, and huge rocks were tumbling.
This necessitated frequent tacks, so that, overhead, the mainsail was ever swooping across from port tack to starboard tack and back again, making air- noises like the swish of wings, sharply rat-tat-tatting its reef points and loudly crashing its mainsheet gear along the traveller.
Suddenly a telegraph post seemed to come crashing through the window and the polished mahogany panels.
One part of it dispersed and waded knee-deep through the snow into a birch forest to the right of the village, and immediately the sound of axes and swords, the crashing of branches, and merry voices could be heard from there.
Holding his head bent down before him, and struggling with the wind that strove to tear the wraps away from him, Levin was moving up to the copse and had just caught sight of something white behind the oak tree, when there was a sudden flash, the whole earth seemed on fire, and the vault of heaven seemed crashing overhead.