credentialism

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cre·den·tial·ism

 (krĭ-dĕn′shə-lĭz′əm)
n.
Overemphasis on diplomas or degrees in giving jobs or conferring social status.

credentialism

(krɪˈdɛnʃəˌlɪzəm)
n
often derogatory a tendency to value formal qualifications, esp at the expense of competence and experience
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results suggest that the labor market in Cali is quite credentialist, as diplomas are required regularly for access to a vacancy.
The Supreme Court is an extreme case, but there are other examples of American institutions becoming narrowly credentialist in their hiring approach.
Credentialist Effects of Schooling in Rural Pakistan.
In an op-ed in Friday's Wall Street Journal called "We Pretend to Teach, They Pretend to Learn," one professor laments the credentialist motives of the mass of students whose lack of preparedness he says is being noticed by employers.
The section 'The unraveling of the credentialist equilibrium' shows how this equilibrium has unraveled as overextended public sectors have restructured and for some time have been unable to fulfill their promise of employment for educated youth.
These credentialist back-formations confirm the necessary feeling that a status outcome is earned, not merely conferred.
in educational administration (although as Blackmore and Sachs [2000] note, it is not so unusual any longer in our credentialist and market-driven society) was based at the time highly on understanding of learning as the commodification and acquiring of a hegemonic and relatively exclusive body of knowledge.
Successively, Bills treats the relationship between schooling and socio-economic success, the relative merits of meritocratic and credentialist accounts of this relationship, how a review of the evidence on lifecycle assists in illustrating modes of scholarship, and what questions are still worth asking, the implications of post-industrial society, the implications for society of ageing, and increasing diversity, (a hot topic in the US currently, with an estimated 12 million illegal immigrants in the country), changes in educational institutions and the youth labour market, and the learning society.
Such an interpretation is consistent with the credentialist perspective, which asserts that an oversupply of graduates leads to the devaluation of credentials (Collins, 1979; Livingstone, 1998).
In the end, more credentialist hoops failed to capture what matters most to good teaching: the actual ability to convey knowledge in the classroom.
To be sure, credentialist theory has much to offer in describing the state of professionalism in American schooling today, and Labaree lays out its major themes clearly and concisely in his first chapter.
Statistical, screening and credentialist hypotheses assert that this has only to be believed by managers for age to be used as a proxy for performance and for attitudes to be realized into discriminatory behaviour[13].