creolist


Also found in: Wikipedia.

creolist

(ˈkriːəʊlɪst)
n
(Linguistics) a student of creole languages
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 2 concentrates on the notion of auto-exoticism in the late 1950s with Rene Menil's anticolonial work and between the late 1980s and the early 1990s with the creolist project of Raphael Confiant and Patrick Chamoiseau.
Tituba's story also pushes against the paradigm of matrilineal, transgenerational knowledge communication that several Caribbean women writers have put forward as a departure from the Creolist model of the male storyteller.
There are two positions that English teachers commonly take toward the use of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) in their classrooms: the creolist position and the nonstandard dialect position (as described for our fictional Ms.
Landscape & Memory was made by Renee Gosson (then assistant professor of French at Bucknell University) and Eric Faden (then assistant professor of film studies at that same institution), with the cooperation of the three founding members of the Creolist movement (in order of their literary fame, Patrick Chamoiseau, Raphael Confiant, and Jean Bernabe).
Pim Higginson extracts a(nother) key figure from the Creolist Weltanschauung--the dog--and illustrates how Conde problematizes prior configurations of this canine exemplar of maroon-centered mythology.
This volume is not merely a translation of Robert Chaudenson's classic Des iles, des hommes, des langues (Paris: L'Harmattan, 1992), but a fully revised and updated version reworked by the author in conjunction with Chicago-based creolist Salikoko Mufwene.
THIS IS THE SECOND volume of memoirs by one of the three Creolist musketeers from Martinique; Ravines du devant-jour (1993; see WLT 68:2, p.
Nevertheless, I hope that the papers collected here may serve as a fitting tribute to Pieter Seuren as a creolist AND as a theoretical linguist.
We could well ask ourselves whether a similar process does not operate in Creolist novels, where a primordial, carnivalesque authenticity is derived from sexual representation.
Instead of a literature that would more truly describe the contemporary "creole" reality of social displacement, the post-BUMIDOM blues, and economic and atavistic racial resentment, (5) this Creolist bad conscience hides itself behind mere verbal acrobatics, instead pursuing and justifying dogmatically the aestheticization and depoliticization of Antillean culture.
The privileged interlocutor here is the current Creolist group (Patrick Chamoiseau and Raphael Confiant) in Martinique, whose work has turned from a focus on the Maroon to celebration of the accomplishments of the slave community on the plantation.