Cretaceous period


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Related to Cretaceous period: Tertiary period, Triassic period, Paleogene Period

Cretaceous period

The third and last period of the Mesozoic era: 144 to 65 million years ago.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cretaceous period - from 135 million to 63 million years ago; end of the age of reptiles; appearance of modern insects and flowering plants
Age of Reptiles, Mesozoic, Mesozoic era - from 230 million to 63 million years ago
References in periodicals archive ?
But he said that angiosperms only start showing up in the fossil record at the beginning of the Cretaceous period, around 120 million years ago.
Although the climate was warmer during the Cretaceous period, when the hadrosaurs lived, Antarctica was situated near the pole and would have been dark for several months each year.
The bidding war over Sue is only the latest conflict to swirl around this relic from the Cretaceous period.
London, April 22 (ANI): A fossil found in China, dating from the middle of the Cretaceous period, may belong to a dinosaur that was probably the ancestor of the Tyrannosaurus Rex.
London, Feb 24 (ANI): The results of a new research indicate that the 'dinosaur-killing' meteorite that struck Earth at the end of the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago did not start global wildfires.
rex, which lived 65 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous period, fed on herbivores that were roughly its size or smaller.
rex, but with large spines on its back and roamed the earth much earlier in the mid Cretaceous period, around 110 million years ago.
That debate began in 1980, when scientists from the University of California, Berkeley discovered evidence that a chunk of rock the size of Manhattan slammed into Earth at the end of the Cretaceous period.
This planetary concussion, posited the scientists, offered the long-sought explanation for the disappearance of the dinosaurs and many other animals at the end of Earth's Cretaceous period.
Geologists have amassed considerable evidence that an extraterrestrial object the size of Mount Everest slammed into the Yucatan region at the close of the Cretaceous period.
Expeditions by the American Museum staff since 1991 have yielded a collection of 400 multituberculate skulls, many of them belonging to complete skeletons from the late Cretaceous period.
However, this site near the O2 in North Greenwich is exactly where you need to go if you fancy whizzing back 67 million years to the Late Cretaceous period.