informant

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in·for·mant

 (ĭn-fôr′mənt)
n.
1.
a. One that gives information.
b. One who informs against others; an informer.
2. One who furnishes linguistic or cultural information to a researcher.

informant

(ɪnˈfɔːmənt)
n
a person who gives information about a thing, a subject being studied, etc

in•form•ant

(ɪnˈfɔr mənt)

n.
1. a person who informs or gives information; informer.
2. a person who supplies social or cultural data in answer to the questions of an investigator.
3. a native speaker of a language who supplies utterances or other data for one analyzing or learning the language.
[1655–65; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.informant - a person who supplies informationinformant - a person who supplies information  
communicator - a person who communicates with others
betrayer, blabber, informer, squealer, rat - one who reveals confidential information in return for money
leaker - a surreptitious informant; "the president wanted to know who the leakers were"
passive source - an informant who is not assigned to obtain specific intelligence but who routinely passes on whatever information he or she has
whistle blower, whistleblower, whistle-blower - an informant who exposes wrongdoing within an organization in the hope of stopping it; "the law gives little protection to whistleblowers who feel the public has a right to know what is going on"; "the whistleblower was fired for exposing the conditions in mental hospitals"
2.informant - someone who sees an event and reports what happened
beholder, observer, perceiver, percipient - a person who becomes aware (of things or events) through the senses
attester, attestant - someone who affirms or vouches for the correctness or truth or genuineness of something
speaker, talker, verbaliser, verbalizer, utterer - someone who expresses in language; someone who talks (especially someone who delivers a public speech or someone especially garrulous); "the speaker at commencement"; "an utterer of useful maxims"
deponent, deposer, testifier - a person who testifies or gives a deposition

informant

noun
One who gives incriminating information about others:
Informal: rat, tipster.
Translations
informátor-ka
meddeler
adatközlõinformátor
heimildamaîur, uppljóstrari
informátor
bilgi veren kimseihbarcı

informant

[ɪnˈfɔːmənt] Ninformante mf
my informantel que me lo dijo
who was your informant?¿quién se lo dijo?

informant

[ɪnˈfɔːrmənt] n
(gen)informateur/trice m/f
(= police informer) → indicateur/trice m/f

informant

n
Informant(in) m(f); according to my informant the book is out of printwie man mir mitteilt or berichtet, ist das Buch vergriffen
(police) informantPolizeispitzel m

informant

[ɪnˈfɔːmənt] ninformatore/trice

inform

(inˈfoːm) verb
1. to tell; to give knowledge to. Please inform me of your intentions in this matter; I was informed that you were absent from the office.
2. (with against or on) to tell facts to eg the police about (a criminal etc). He informed against his fellow thieves.
inˈformant noun
someone who tells or informs. He passed on the news to us, but would not say who his informant had been.
ˌinforˈmation noun
facts told or knowledge gained or given. Can you give me any information about this writer?; the latest information on the progress of the war; He is full of interesting bits of information.
inˈformative (-mətiv) adjective
giving useful information. an informative book.
inˈformer noun
a person who informs against a criminal etc.
ˌinformation ˌsuperˈhighway noun
a fast computer channel through which information, pictures etc are sent from one computer to another.
inforˈmation techˌnology noun
the study and use of electronic systems and computers for storing, analysing and utilizing information.
information does not have a plural: some information ; any information .
References in periodicals archive ?
I then consider how relations between police and users amount to a mainstreaming of undercover investigations and the use of criminal informants.
393) Montana also requires a cautionary jury instruction in cases involving criminal informant testimony, (394) although it has not implemented reforms in eyewitness identification procedures.
Ninety-nine percent of all drug cases start off with a criminal informant.
The use of criminal informants is a massive source of error in our most serious cases," said Natapoff, who also wrote the book Snitching: Criminal Informants and the Erosion of American Justice.
59) Though resolving this overarching debate is well beyond the scope of this Article, one point of contention relevant to the case of criminal informants is whether there is some moral good to loyalty that can be divorced from loyalty's object.
SCOTS police forces are paying at least pounds 250,000 a year to criminal informants, new figures reveal.
The use of criminal informants is most common in drug enforcement, which relies on snitching at every stage of the legal process, from investigations to arrests to plea bargaining to sentencing.

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