adultery

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a·dul·ter·y

 (ə-dŭl′tə-rē, -trē)
n. pl. a·dul·ter·ies
Consensual sexual intercourse between a married person and a person other than the spouse.

[Middle English, from Old French adultere, from Latin adulterium, from adulter, adulterer; see adulterate.]

adultery

(əˈdʌltərɪ)
n, pl -teries
(Law) voluntary sexual intercourse between a married man or woman and a partner other than the legal spouse
[C15: adulterie, altered (as if directly from Latin adulterium) from C14 avoutrie, via Old French from Latin adulterium, from adulter, back formation from adulterāre. See adulterate]

a•dul•ter•y

(əˈdʌl tə ri)

n., pl. -ter•ies.
voluntary sexual intercourse between a married person and someone other than his or her lawful spouse.
[1325–75; Middle English a(d)vouterie < Old French avoutrie < Latin adulterium=adulter (adulterāre adulterate) + -ium -ium1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adultery - extramarital sex that willfully and maliciously interferes with marriage relationsadultery - extramarital sex that willfully and maliciously interferes with marriage relations; "adultery is often cited as grounds for divorce"
extramarital sex, free love - sexual intercourse between individuals who are not married to one another

adultery

noun unfaithfulness, infidelity, cheating (informal), fornication, playing the field (slang), extramarital sex, playing away from home (slang), illicit sex, unchastity, extramarital relations, extracurricular sex (informal), extramarital congress, having an affair or a fling She is going to divorce him on the grounds of adultery.
fidelity, chastity, faithfulness
Quotations
"It is not marriage but a mockery of it, a merging that mixes love and dread together like jackstraws" [Alexander Theroux An Adultery]
"Adultery is the application of democracy to love" [H.L. Mencken]
"The first breath of adultery is the freest; after it, constraints aping marriage develop" [John Updike Couples]
Translations
زِنَى
cizoložství
ægteskabsbrudutroskab
preljub
házasságtörés
framhjáhald, hjúskaparbrot
svetimavimas
cudzoložstvo
hor

adultery

[əˈdʌltərɪ] Nadulterio m

adultery

[əˈdʌltəri] nadultère m
to commit adultery → commettre l'adultère

adultery

nEhebruch m; to commit adulteryEhebruch begehen; because of his adultery with three actressesweil er mit drei Schauspielerinnen Ehebruch begangen hatte

adultery

[əˈdʌltərɪ] nadulterio

adultery

(əˈdaltəri) noun
sexual intercourse between a husband and a woman who is not his wife or between a wife and a man who is not her husband.

adultery

n. adulterio.
References in classic literature ?
It is not precisely the same in any two of the States; and varies in each with every revision of its criminal laws.
Through this vast throng, sprinkled doubtless here and there with honest zealots, but composed for the most part of the very scum and refuse of London, whose growth was fostered by bad criminal laws, bad prison regulations, and the worst conceivable police, such of the members of both Houses of Parliament as had not taken the precaution to be already at their posts, were compelled to fight and force their way.
There was a bookcase in the room; I saw, from the backs of the books, that they were about evidence, criminal law, criminal biography, trials, acts of parliament, and such things.
It is for this reason that the criminal law has been in all ages more severe than it would have been if the impulse to ameliorate the criminal had been what really inspired it.
This functionary, being, of course, well used to such scenes; looking upon all kinds of robbery, from petty larceny up to housebreaking or ventures on the highway, as matters in the regular course of business; and regarding the perpetrators in the light of so many customers coming to be served at the wholesale and retail shop of criminal law where he stood behind the counter; received Mr Brass's statement of facts with about as much interest and surprise, as an undertaker might evince if required to listen to a circumstantial account of the last illness of a person whom he was called in to wait upon professionally; and took Kit into custody with a decent indifference.
It is my duty to warn you that it will be used against you," cried the inspector, with the magnificent fair play of the British criminal law.
See also Jerome Hall, General Principles of Criminal Laws 124 (2d ed.
Macdonald's "national policy" included the consolidation of provincial criminal laws into a national criminal code after the founding of the Dominion of Canada in 1867.
Gender, Sexuality and the Criminal Laws in the Middle East and North Africa: A Comparative Study Sherifa Zuhur, 2005
Then, as criminal laws supplemented or replaced ecclesiastical laws, same-sex relations became crimes as well.
Traditional criminal laws can punish deliberate actions to harm persons or property, such as poisoning a water supply or dumping debris on someone else's land.
Helped by more equitable criminal laws and freed from the old double standards, officials should be held responsible for equal enforcement of the law throughout the whole of the criminal-justice process: arrest, charging, counseling, prosecution, conviction, sentencing, and punishment.