defamation

(redirected from Criminal libel)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Criminal libel: slander, Defamatory libel

def·a·ma·tion

 (dĕf′ə-mā′shən)
n.
The act of defaming; calumny, slander, or libel.

de·fam′a·to′ry (dĭ-făm′ə-tôr′ē) adj.

defamation

(ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃən)
n
1. (Law) law the injuring of a person's good name or reputation. Compare libel, slander
2. (Law) the act of defaming or state of being defamed

def•a•ma•tion

(ˌdɛf əˈmeɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of defaming, esp. unjustified injury to another's reputation, as by slander or libel.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Medieval Latin]
de•fam•a•to•ry (dɪˈfæm əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.defamation - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actionsdefamation - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
assassination, blackwash, character assassination - an attack intended to ruin someone's reputation
malignment, smear, vilification - slanderous defamation
libel - a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
slander - words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
name calling, names - verbal abuse; a crude substitute for argument; "sticks and stones may break my bones but names can never hurt me"
epithet, name - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
2.defamation - an abusive attack on a person's character or good name
attack - strong criticism; "he published an unexpected attack on my work"

defamation

defamation

noun
The expression of injurious, malicious statements about someone:
Law: libel.
Translations
pomluva
ærekrenkelseærekrenking

defamation

[ˌdefəˈmeɪʃən] Ndifamación f

defamation

[ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃən] ndiffamation f
defamation of character → diffamation f

defamation

nDiffamierung f, → Verleumdung f; defamation of characterRufmord m

defamation

[ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃn] n (frm) → diffamazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
Kolawole is also demanding damages of N10 billion each from Fayose's spokesman, Lere Olayinka and a member of the state's House of Assembly for alleged criminal libel and defamation on a statement they allegedly made on a television and radio programme.
The Hurriyet Daily at the time reported that the ruling had been based on charges of "provoking people and inciting them to hatred, intentional injury and criminal libel.
In the US, criminal libel is not a federal offense.
By doing away with all laws that suppress free expression, such as the criminal libel law, and enacting measures that strengthen the same.
As skeptics of the Cold War gained the upper hand in American academia, Conquest's work was dismissed as reactionary fantasy and criminal libel.
According to a long-standing legend in Nova Scotia's Province House, future premier Joseph Howe, renowned for successfully defending himself against criminal libel, had his own door to the Legislative Council chamber installed so that he could observe the proceedings as he pleased.
In 1895, Oscar Wilde lost his criminal libel case against the Marquess of Queensberry, who'd accused the writer of homosexual practices.
This act is in pari materia with the English Defamation Act 1952 and governs civil defamation whilst sections 499 and 500 of the Malaysian Penal Code deal with criminal libel.
Egged on by his lover (and Queensberry's son) Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde took legal action against the Marquis who was arrested for criminal libel.
In mid-March, though, prosecutors took the unprecedented step of charging Natalya Sadykova, an Assandi Times journalist formerly based in Aktobe, a town in western Kazakhstan, with criminal libel.
Harrison Salisbury, the legendary Times reporter and editor, estimated that the Times faced about $3 million in libel and criminal libel verdicts in the South, all flowing from civil rights coverage.