criminous


Also found in: Legal.

criminous

(ˈkrɪmɪnəs)
adj
(Sociology) archaic criminal
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
There was daylight enough for me in the drawing-room below; and there I would sit immersed in criminous tomes weakly fascinated until I shivered and shook in my stocking soles.
In bringing control over a disobedient bishop and criminous clerks into the picture, Sartore muddies the waters still further, without providing any substantive discussion of how abjuration and sanctuary operated as forms of exclusion, and how they interacted with outlawry and exile.
But, as any theater lover knows, depicting acts of wrong-doing is not a recent phenomenon: history is resplendent with criminous works-- from the stark, violent plays of Seneca in ancient Rome to the liturgical dramas of the Dark Ages that drew on both the Old and New Testaments, to the golden age of Elizabethan drama, which boasted masterful plays drenched with treachery, bloodshed, and horror.
The conflict between Henry II and Thomas a Beckett concerned the power of ecclesiastical courts alone to try criminous clerks.
Research on how attitudes toward Vietnamese refugees in Hong Kong evolved from humanitarian in the mid-1970s to outright hostility by 1990, suggests that the Hong Kong media typecast the Vietnamese as "deviant, criminous, aggressive and sinister in nature" (Bun 1990, 102).
All these primitive productions were, of course, transient, flimsy nibblings for the hungry moths of time, and the intention here is to identify those records of murder and malfeasance which may be regarded as constituting the classic literature of the criminous.
True, laypeople worried that churchmen would go soft on their own, an essential point behind King Henry's intent to try criminous clerics himself, matched by Becket's defense to the death of his jurisdiction.