Criseyde


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Criseyde

(krɪˈseɪdə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) a variant of Cressida
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolfe appropriately refers to Caxton's Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye and Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde as "two medieval retellings of Trojan legend that debate the ancient originals on which they are modeled" (299), but does not mention that the former was the first book printed in English (Bruges, 1473) and the latter among the very first printed in England (Westminster, 1483).
The earliest known use of the English word fury in print is found in Chaucer's late 14th-century poem "Troilus and Criseyde," and the earliest known reference in print to the Greek goddesses as furies appears slightly later in Chaucer's "The Legend of Good Women.
It is a well-known fact that Henryson's Testament of Cresseid is based on Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, a poem which--despite its neat five-book division--has been perceived as lacking a definite ending, and thus incomplete.
That view stands in sharp contrast to, say, that of Chaucer in Troilus and Criseyde, which is indifferent to Trojan history because it is more concerned with courtly love than with military history.
The following section is devoted to analyzing the main characters--Troilus, Pandarus, and Criseyde--in the Troilus and Criseyde in terms of how their individual destinies are interwoven with the preordained fate of Troy.
Shortlisted alongside Colette Bryce's collection The Whole and Rain-domed Universe, Kei Miller's The Cartographer Tries to Map a Way to Zion and Lavinia Greenlaw's A Double Sorrow: Troilus and Criseyde, Edwards was awarded the honour at the 43rd annual book awards on Monday night in London.
The fourth chapter examines two related works that deal directly with Trojan material: Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde (especially in terms of its most notable Scottish manuscript witness, Bodleian Arch.
15) So, when Harington reads in Troilus and Criseyde, "How hast thou thus unkyndly a longe / Hyd this fro me, thou fole (qd Pandarus)," he returns to the previous line and marks the change of speaker with a bracket, apparently having realized in the second line that there has been a change to Pandarus.
Betteridge places the letter, on the one hand, in the context of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde in which letter-writing, secret messages, etc.
This book collects nine essays published since 1980, plus one new essay: oTowards a Bohemian Reading of Troilus and Criseyde.
finds good evidence for it in Troilus and Criseyde.
Besserman offers thorough readings of Caedmon's Hymn and two Middle English lyrics as well as detailed readings of portions of the Old English Exodus, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Troilus and Criseyde, and Le Morte Darthur.