cruiser

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Related to Cruisers: cruises

cruis·er

 (kro͞o′zər)
n.
1. One of a class of fast warships of medium tonnage with a long cruising radius and less armor and firepower than a battleship.
2. A cabin cruiser.
3. See squad car.

cruiser

(ˈkruːzə)
n
1. (Military) a high-speed, long-range warship of medium displacement, armed with medium calibre weapons or missiles
2. (Nautical Terms) Also called: cabin cruiser a pleasure boat, esp one that is power-driven and has a cabin
3. any person or thing that cruises
4. (Boxing) boxing cruiserweight. See light heavyweight

cruis•er

(ˈkru zər)

n.
1. one of a class of warships designed for high speed and long cruising radius.
[1670–80; < Dutch kruiser=kruis(en) to cruise + -er -er1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cruiser - a car in which policemen cruise the streetscruiser - a car in which policemen cruise the streets; equipped with radiotelephonic communications to headquarters
auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine - a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"
panda car - a police cruiser
2.cruiser - a large fast warship; smaller than a battleship and larger than a destroyer
battle cruiser - a cruiser of maximum speed and firepower
guided missile cruiser - a cruiser that carries guided missiles
combat ship, war vessel, warship - a government ship that is available for waging war
3.cruiser - a large motorboat that has a cabin and plumbing and other conveniences necessary for living on boardcruiser - a large motorboat that has a cabin and plumbing and other conveniences necessary for living on board
motorboat, powerboat - a boat propelled by an internal-combustion engine
Translations
طَرّادهيخْت ذو مُحرّك
křižníkmotorová jachta
krydsermotorbåd
risteilijäristeilyalus
cirkáló
beitiskip, hraîskreitt herskiplystibátur
krížnik
gezinti gemisikruvazör

cruiser

[ˈkruːzəʳ] N (Naut) → crucero m

cruiser

[ˈkruːzər] n (= ship) → croiseur m

cruiser

n (Naut) → Kreuzer m; (= pleasure cruiser)Vergnügungsjacht f

cruiser

[ˈkruːzəʳ] n (Naut) → incrociatore m

cruise

(kruːz) verb
1. to sail for pleasure. We're going cruising in the Mediterranean.
2. to go at a steady, comfortable speed. The plane is cruising at an altitude of 10,000 metres.
noun
a voyage from place to place made for pleasure and relaxation. They went on a cruise.
ˈcruiser noun
1. a high-speed battleship.
2. (also ˈcabin-cruiser) a motor yacht with living quarters.
References in classic literature ?
In futherance of this choice, it so happened that a ship lay in the harbour; one of those unquestionable cruisers, frequent at that day, which, without being absolutely outlaws of the deep, yet roamed over its surface with a remarkable irresponsibility of character.
thou terror of all cruisers that crossed their wakes in the vicinity of the Tattoo Land?
Though by the repeated bloody chastisements they have received at the hands of European cruisers, the audacity of these corsairs has of late been somewhat repressed; yet, even at the present day, we occasionally hear of English and American vessels, which, in those waters, have been remorselessly boarded and pillaged.
All the coasts were beset by Dutch cruisers, which made it difficult to sail without running the hazard of being taken.
The renegade repeated this to me, and I replied that I was very willing to do so; but he replied that it was not advisable, because if they were left there they would at once raise the country and stir up the city, and lead to the despatch of swift cruisers in pursuit, and our being taken, by sea or land, without any possibility of escape; and that all that could be done was to set them free on the first Christian ground we reached.
This idea soon became so insupportable to her that at the risk of whatever terrible consequences might result to herself from it, she implored the captain to put her on shore; but the captain, eager to escape from his false position-placed between French and English cruisers, like the bat between the mice and the birds--was in great haste to regain England, and positively refused to obey what he took for a woman's caprice, promising his passenger, who had been particularly recommended to him by the cardinal, to land her, if the sea and the French permitted him, at one of the ports of Brittany, either at Lorient or Brest.
If you had endeavored to fly, you would have fallen into the hands of the cruisers that plow the sea in all directions, on the watch for you.
It was made up of four battleships and five armoured cruisers ranking almost with battleships, not one of which was of a later date than 1913.
If I hoped to serve my country there and sweep the Confederate cruisers from the Adriatic, I am afraid my prime intent was to add to her literature and to my own credit.
Battle-ships of the first-class should bear the names of kingdoms of the federation; armored cruisers the names of kings; cruisers the names of cities, and so on down the line.
They've run away from second class Russian cruisers more than once up there off Siberia.
They sent their revenue cutters and dispatch boots and lighthouse tenders, and they sent their last antiquated cruisers and battleships.