Crummock Water


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Related to Crummock Water: Wast Water

Crummock Water

(ˈkrʌmək)
n
(Placename) a lake in NW England, in Cumbria in the Lake District. Length: 4 km (2.5 miles)
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References in periodicals archive ?
3 Follow a gentle incline to the summit, offering another superb panorama of Rannerdale and Crummock Water.
The Kirkstile Inn, in the western lakes between Crummock Water and Loweswater, is one.
The 45-year-old had been missing for a week before his body was discovered in a lake known as Crummock Water on Friday night.
Price includes Private coach travel from your local area Three nights' stay with three course evening meal & cooked breakfast Entrance to Acorn Bank & Muncaster Castle Three minibus tours taking in Derwent Water, Borrowdale, Honister Pass, Buttermere, Crummock Water, Loweswater, Cockermouth, Wastwater (Britain's Favourite View), Hawkshead & Tarn Hows Coach tour of Great Langdale
On our last day, we headed out in the car for a trip taking in Bassenthwaite Lake (it's the only lake in the district, say locals, the rest are meres and waters), Loweswater and Crummock Water, before heading down to Windermere on our way home.
The result makes for a fine collection of images, accompanying a roll-call of splendid names--Nannycatch Beck, Crummock Water, Crackpot Hall--although Frenkel isn't dogmatic about the route, suggesting various detours, and draws on her familiarity with the area for anecdotal detail, such as the night she spent camping near Stonethwaite Beck that became a morning very nearly camped within it.
Though one of the smaller Cumbrian hills, the views overlooking lake Crummock Water and Scale Force, the highest waterfall in the Lake District are breathtaking.
Lorton is situated between Keswick and Cockermouth in the Vale of Lorton at the end of the Whinlatter Pass, and is close to Crummock Water and Buttermere.
The clipping on the back of today's photograph, above, reads: "This leisurely scene on the shores of Crummock Water, Cumberland, shows that in some places the horse has not yet been replaced by the tractor.
lakeland majesty Fell-walking guide writer Alfred Wainwright (inset) and the mountains around Crummock Water, near Keswick water's edge Gentle countryside around one of the many lakes
Heading down the other side is a bit like going through the back of Narnia's wardrobe into another world, because suddenly there are more lakes - three in a row, Buttermere, Crummock Water and Loweswater - and far fewer people.
Found between Loweswater and Crummock Water and not far from Buttermere, it's slightly off the tourist track and all the better for it.