cryptography

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Related to Cryptographers: cryptology, cryptologists

cryp·tog·ra·phy

 (krĭp-tŏg′rə-fē)
n.
1. Computers Any of various mathematical techniques for encrypting and decrypting data in order to keep it private when transmitted or stored electronically.
2. The process or skill of communicating in or deciphering secret writings or ciphers.
3. Secret writing.

cryp′to·graph′ic (-tə-grăf′ĭk) adj.
cryp′to·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

cryptography

(krɪpˈtɒɡrəfɪ) or

cryptology

n
(Communications & Information) the science or study of analysing and deciphering codes, ciphers, etc; cryptanalysis
crypˈtographer, crypˈtographist, crypˈtologist n
cryptographic, ˌcryptoˈgraphical, cryptologic, ˌcryptoˈlogical adj
ˌcryptoˈgraphically adv

cryp•tog•ra•phy

(krɪpˈtɒg rə fi)

n.
the study or the application of the techniques of secret writing, esp. code and cipher systems. Compare cryptanalysis.
[1635–45]
cryp•tog′ra•pher, cryp•tog′ra•phist, n.
cryp`to•graph′ic (-təˈgræf ɪk) cryp`to•graph′i•cal, adj.

cryptography

1. the science or study of secret writing, especially code and cipher systems.
2. the procedures and methods of making and using secret languages, as codes or ciphers. — cryptographer, cryptographist, n.cryptographic, cryptographical, cryptographal, adj.
See also: Writing
1. the science or study of secret writing, especially code and cipher systems.
2. the procedures and methods of making and using secret languages, as codes or ciphers. — cryptographer, cryptographist, n. — cryptographic, cryptographical, cryptographal, adj.
See also: Language
1. the science or study of secret writing, especially codes and ciphers.
2. the procedures and methods of making and using codes and ciphers. — cryptographer, cryptographist, n. — cryptographic, adj.
See also: Code
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cryptography - the science of analyzing and deciphering codes and ciphers and cryptograms
science, scientific discipline - a particular branch of scientific knowledge; "the science of genetics"
2.cryptography - act of writing in code or cipher
committal to writing, writing - the activity of putting something in written form; "she did the thinking while he did the writing"
encoding, encryption - the activity of converting data or information into code
recoding - converting from one code to another
decipherment, decoding, decryption - the activity of making clear or converting from code into plain text; "a secret key or password is required for decryption"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Since its rediscovery over 100 years ago, there have been several attempts to decipher its contents, and the manuscript itself has been a challenge for cryptographers ever since.
A team of German cryptographers claims to have discovered flaws in WhatsApp Group chats despite the end-to-end encryption technology the instant messaging platform uses.
Breaking this code had eluded the best efforts of SIS cryptographers until August 1940, when SIS was finally able to read Purple message traffic between the Japanese government and its official representatives in the United States.
It came in the form of a report by 14 of the world's leading cryptographers and computer scientists, who concluded that efforts by the U.
The method however remained classified until it was independently patented by a pair of American cryptographers.
Often there isn't time for a messenger to regrow a head of hair, so cryptographers (people who specialize in coding and decoding messages) devised other ways for sending secret messages.
The book also reports on the work of Polish cryptographers and the creation of the first programmable, digital computer, which was used in intelligence during WWII.
I make an exception for Mrs Kay Dallas who writes from Gloucester to remind us that there were many more unsung heroes of World War Two engaged on cracking German codes, beyond the now-famous cryptographers of Bletchley Park.
Cryptographers are kept occupied devising methods by which the keys to encrypted information can be exchanged.
The cryptographers who worked at the site, once the most secret place in Britain, are credited with helping to shorten World War Two by up to two years and save countless lives by deciphering around 3,000 German military messages a day.
Cryptographers won't have as easy a task this time around.