relativism

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Related to Cultural relativism: Ethical relativism

rel·a·tiv·ism

 (rĕl′ə-tĭ-vĭz′əm)
n. Philosophy
The theory that value judgments, as of truth, beauty, or morality, have no universal validity but are valid only for the persons or groups holding them.

relativism

(ˈrɛlətɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) any theory holding that truth or moral or aesthetic value, etc, is not universal or absolute but may differ between individuals or cultures. See also historicism
ˈrelativist n, adj

rel•a•tiv•ism

(ˈrɛl ə təˌvɪz əm)

n.
any theory of knowledge, truth, morality, etc., holding that criteria of judgment may vary with individuals and their environments.
[1860–65]
rel′a•tiv•ist, n.

relativism

any theory maintaining that criteria of judgment vary with individuals and their environments; relationism. Cf. ethical relativism.relativist, n.relativistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

relativism

The view that there are no absolute truths or values.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.relativism - (philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that all criteria of judgment are relative to the individuals and situations involved
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
relativizam
relativismo

relativism

[ˈrelətɪvɪzəm] Nrelativismo m

relativism

nRelativismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
He emphasised cultural relativism to suggest that cultural monolithicity was a myth as culture was an ever-changing and ongoing phenomenon.
Soon thereafter, a new breed of anthropologists came to the fore, however, who criticised the evolutionary perspective, and instead began promoting the idea of cultural relativism.
What we see from their statements, then, is the (mis)use of 'Asian values' to destabilize the idea of a universal concept of human rights: a cultural relativism that taps into people's sentiments of nationalism and postcolonialism.
Contradicting the theory of cultural relativism, author Oliver Nahm argues that there are universals in how various cultures deal with death, human mortality, and the problems death poses, and that these similarities stem from commonalities of human nature across cultures.
While traditional Indigenous culture and peoples were first presented through the perspective of white superiority, in the later part of the period a significant shift toward cultural relativism and tolerance (despite the persistence of portraying their culture as "artifacts of history") can be observed.
This paper reviews the four new principles in DSM-5: 1) A spectrum (also called "dimensional") approach to the definition of mental illness; 2) recognition of the role played by environmental risk factors related to stress and trauma in predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating mental illness; 3) cultural relativism in diagnosis and treatment of mental illness; and 4) recognizing the adverse effects of psychiatric medications on patients.
In the first part of this book, Sayyid focuses on how demands for Muslim autonomy are debated in terms such as democracy, cultural relativism, secularism, and liberalism.
Arguing from a perspective of cultural relativism, the thesis provides a detailed account of child protection issues in kakuma refugee camp.
On the issue of how to approach divergent cultures, the methodological principle of cultural and social anthropology called cultural relativism is coming more to the foreground.
Her introduction outlines the scope of gendered violence, criticizes the application of cultural relativism in sheltering perpetrators for censure, and presents her point that the sources of such violence are structural more than individual.
Any criticism of this cultural relativism is "petty bourgeois judgementalism".

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