Cumberland


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Cumberland

(ˈkʌmbələnd)
n
(Placename) (until 1974) a county of NW England, now part of Cumbria

Cumberland

(ˈkʌmbələnd)
n
1. (Biography) Richard. 1631–1718, English theologian and moral philosopher; bishop of Peterborough (1691–1718)
2. (Biography) William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, known as Butcher Cumberland. 1721–65, English soldier, younger son of George II, noted for his defeat of Charles Edward Stuart at Culloden (1746) and his subsequent ruthless destruction of Jacobite rebels

Cum•ber•land

(ˈkʌm bər lənd)

n.
1. a former county in NW England, now part of Cumbria.
2. a city in NW Maryland, on the Potomac River. 23,230.
3. a river flowing W from SE Kentucky through N Tennessee into the Ohio River. 687 mi. (1106 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cumberland - English generalCumberland - English general; son of George II; fought unsuccessfully in the battle of Fontenoy (1721-1765)
2.Cumberland - a river that rises in southeastern Kentucky and flows westward through northern Tennessee to become a tributary of the Ohio River in southwestern KentuckyCumberland - a river that rises in southeastern Kentucky and flows westward through northern Tennessee to become a tributary of the Ohio River in southwestern Kentucky
Bluegrass State, Kentucky, KY - a state in east central United States; a border state during the American Civil War; famous for breeding race horses
Tennessee, TN, Volunteer State - a state in east central United States
References in classic literature ?
Shortly after, we left this place, not thinking it safe to stay there longer, and proceeded to Cumberland river, reconnoitring that part of the country until March, 1771, and giving names to the different waters.
She was not allowed much time for meditation: a monitor, a great rough girl, presently came up, exclaiming in a strong Cumberland accent -
The letter is not dated; but the postmark is 'Allonby,' which I have found, on referring to the Gazetteer, to be a little sea-side place in Cumberland.
I was not new to violent death--I have served his Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland, and got a wound myself at Fontenoy-- but I know my pulse went dot and carry one.
It bore more northwards, coasted the Islands of Murray, and came back to the south-west towards Cumberland Passage.
The room was most dear to her, and she would not have changed its furniture for the handsomest in the house, though what had been originally plain had suffered all the ill-usage of children; and its greatest elegancies and ornaments were a faded footstool of Julia's work, too ill done for the drawing-room, three transparencies, made in a rage for transparencies, for the three lower panes of one window, where Tintern Abbey held its station between a cave in Italy and a moonlight lake in Cumberland, a collection of family profiles, thought unworthy of being anywhere else, over the mantelpiece, and by their side, and pinned against the wall, a small sketch of a ship sent four years ago from the Mediterranean by William, with H.
Kadlu traded the rich, creamy, twisted narwhal horn and musk-ox teeth (these are just as valuable as pearls) to the Southern Inuit, and they, in turn, traded with the whalers and the missionary-posts of Exeter and Cumberland Sounds; and so the chain went on, till a kettle picked up by a ship's cook in the Bhendy Bazaar might end its days over a blubber-lamp somewhere on the cool side of the Arctic Circle.
He dared not hope that Griffiths had gone away already, without Mildred, to his home in Cumberland.
A fine big moor, miss, in Cumberland, without a tree in sight--look where you may.
Morgan, when he was driven from Cumberland Gap to the Ohio river by General Kirby Smith.
William Wordsworth was born at Cockermouth in Cumberland in 1770.
These tubes resemble in every particular those from Drigg in Cumberland, described in the Geological Transactions.