curbless

curbless

(ˈkɜːblɪs)
adj
with no curb or restraint
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most common ways to achieve this is by creating a wet room or removing the bathtub and replacing it with a new curbless shower.
Also on Gonzalez's universal design to-do list: Having a larger percentage of cabinets from the counter level down (to avoid the need for a resident to stand on chair to reach an item), installing more slip-resistant flooring and curbless snake showers with trench drains and replacing "institutional-looking" grab bars in showers with those designed to look like a decorative accessory.
Curbless entry and automatic doors cater to the accessibility needs of the center's clients, who are typically elderly.
The trend is the curbless shower entry, meaning the shower and the bathroom floor are on the same level.
Concept One calls for the reconstruction of 7th Street near All-America Square into a "festival street" with decorative pavement materials and a curbless cross-section.
A curbless shower with linear drain reduces wet floors and the possibility of slips and falls.
Open floorplans, wider halls and doors, ample lite, zero-step entries, and curbless showers have never been more appealing.
They include curbless showers, hardwood floors and open floor plans.
Top priorities included grab bars, higher toilets, curbless showers, and wider doorways.
Bathroom: Install a curbless shower (one that is flush with the floor) with a height-adjustable handheld showerhead, a shower valve with an anti-scald mechanism, and grab bars (have your walls reinforced so that the bars don't fall out when you put your weight on them).
Like curbless showers where there is nothing to step over or up to or bathtubs where there is room to sit and swing their legs over.
Just because walk-in, curbless showers are easy to roll in and out of doesn't mean remodelers should market them by "talking about wheelchairs," O'Connor says.