cutter

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cut·ter

 (kŭt′ər)
n.
1. One that cuts, especially in tailoring.
2. A device or machine that cuts.
3. Nautical
a. A single-masted, fore-and-aft-rigged sailing vessel with two or more headsails and a mast set somewhat farther aft than that of a sloop.
b. A ship's boat, powered by a motor or oars and used for transporting stores or passengers.
c. A patrol boat, especially a US Coast Guard ship that is at least 65 feet long and has accommodations for the crew.
4. A small sleigh, usually seating one person and drawn by a single horse.
5. Baseball See cut fastball.

cutter

(ˈkʌtə)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a person or thing that cuts, esp a person who cuts cloth for clothing
2. (Nautical Terms) a sailing boat with its mast stepped further aft so as to have a larger foretriangle than that of a sloop
3. (Nautical Terms) a ship's boat, powered by oars or sail, for carrying passengers or light cargo
4. (Nautical Terms) a small lightly armed boat, as used in the enforcement of customs regulations
5. (Cookery) a pig weighing between 68 and 82 kg, from which fillets and larger joints are cut

cut•ter

(ˈkʌt ər)

n.
1. a person who cuts, esp. as a job, as one who cuts fabric for garments or film for editing.
2. a device for cutting.
3. a single-masted sailing vessel, similar to a sloop but having its mast farther astern.
4. a lightly armed government vessel.
5. a small, light sleigh, usu. single-seated and pulled by one horse.
[1375–1425]

cutter

1. In naval mine warfare, a device fitted to a sweep wire to cut or part the moorings of mines or obstructors; it may also be fitted in the mooring of a mine or obstructor to part a sweep.
2. (DOD only) Coast Guard watercraft 65 feet long or larger. See also mine warfare; watercraft.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cutter - someone who cuts or carves stonecutter - someone who cuts or carves stone  
quarrier, quarryman - a man who works in a quarry
2.cutter - someone who carves the meat
diner - a person eating a meal (especially in a restaurant)
3.cutter - someone whose work is cutting (as e.g. cutting cloth for garments)
garment cutter - someone who cuts cloth etc. to measure in making garments
gem cutter - one who cuts and shapes precious stones
glass cutter, glass-cutter - someone who cuts or grinds designs on glass
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
4.cutter - a boat for communication between ship and shorecutter - a boat for communication between ship and shore
boat - a small vessel for travel on water
gig - tender that is a light ship's boat; often for personal use of captain
5.cutter - a sailing vessel with a single mast set further back than the mast of a sloop
sailing ship, sailing vessel - a vessel that is powered by the wind; often having several masts
6.cutter - a cutting implementcutter - a cutting implement; a tool for cutting
bolt cutter - an implement for cutting bolts
cigar cutter - an implement for cutting the tip off of a cigar
cutting implement - a tool used for cutting or slicing
die - a cutting tool that is fitted into a diestock and used for cutting male (external) screw threads on screws or bolts or pipes or rods
edge tool - any cutting tool with a sharp cutting edge (as a chisel or knife or plane or gouge)
glass cutter - a tool for cutting glass
tile cutter - a cutter (tool for cutting) for floor tiles
Translations
زَوْرَققَطاع، مِقْطَـع
brusičkutrřezačšalupa
=-knivbrændehuggerglarmesterkuttertilskærer
kutterileikkaajaleikkuriyhteysvene
egyárbocos hajószabászszán
kútter, skútamaîur sem sker/klippir; hnífur, skeri
brusičrezbár
kesicikotra

cutter

[ˈkʌtəʳ] N
1. (= tool) → cortadora f; (for paper, cardboard) → cutter m
wire cutterscizalla fsing, cortaalambres m
2. (= person) → cortador(a) m/f
3. (= boat) → cúter m (US) (= coastguard) → patrullero m, guardacostas m

cutter

[ˈkʌtər] n
(= tool) (for paper, cardboard)cutter m bolt cutter, pastry cutter, wire cutter
(= person) glass cutter → tailleur m de verre
stone cutter → tailleur m de pierre
(= boat) → vedette fcut-throat cutthroat [ˈkʌtθrəʊt]
n (old-fashioned) (= assassin) → assassin m
adj (= ruthless) [market, industry] → férocement compétitif/ive
cut-throat competition → concurrence f sauvage, concurrence f impitoyable

cutter

n
(= tool)Messer nt; a pair of (wire) cutterseine Drahtschere; (Elec) → ein Seitenschneider m
(of clothes)Zuschneider(in) m(f); (of jewel)Schleifer(in) m(f); (of glass)Glasschneider(in) m(f); (Film) → Cutter(in) m(f)
(= boat)Kutter m; (US: = coastguard’s boat) → Boot ntder Küstenwache
(US: = sleigh) → leichter Pferdeschlitten

cutter

[ˈkʌtəʳ] n
a. (person) → tagliatore/trice; (tool) → taglierina
b. (sailing ship) → cutter m inv; (ship's boat) → lancia

cut

(kat) present participle ˈcutting: past tense past participle cut verb
1. to make an opening in, usually with something with a sharp edge. He cut the paper with a pair of scissors.
2. to separate or divide by cutting. She cut a slice of bread; The child cut out the pictures; She cut up the meat into small pieces.
3. to make by cutting. She cut a hole in the cloth.
4. to shorten by cutting; to trim. to cut hair; I'll cut the grass.
5. to reduce. They cut my wages by ten per cent.
6. to remove. They cut several passages from the film.
7. to wound or hurt by breaking the skin (of). I cut my hand on a piece of glass.
8. to divide (a pack of cards).
9. to stop. When the actress said the wrong words, the director ordered `Cut!'
10. to take a short route or way. He cut through/across the park on his way to the office; A van cut in in front of me on the motorway.
11. to meet and cross (a line or geometrical figure). An axis cuts a circle in two places.
12. to stay away from (a class, lecture etc). He cut school and went to the cinema.
13. (also cut dead) to ignore completely. She cut me dead in the High Street.
noun
1. the result of an act of cutting. a cut on the head; a power-cut (= stoppage of electrical power); a haircut; a cut in prices.
2. the way in which something is tailored, fashioned etc. the cut of the jacket.
3. a piece of meat cut from an animal. a cut of beef.
ˈcutter noun
1. a person or thing that cuts. a wood-cutter; a glass-cutter.
2. a type of small sailing ship.
ˈcutting noun
1. a piece of plant cut off and replanted to form another plant.
2. an article cut out from a newspaper etc. She collects cuttings about the Royal Family.
3. a trench dug through a hillside etc, in which a railway, road etc is built.
adjective
insulting or offending. a cutting remark.
cut glass
glass with ornamental patterns cut on the surface, used for drinking glasses etc.
ˈcut-price
cheaper than normal. cut-price goods; a cut-price store.
ˈcut-throat noun
a murderer.
adjective
fierce; ruthless. cut-throat business competition.
a cut above
(obviously) better than. He's a cut above the average engineer.
cut and dried
fixed and definite. cut-and-dried opinions.
cut back to reduce considerably: The government cut back (on) public spending (noun ˈcutback)
cut both ways
to affect both parts of a question, both people involved, good and bad points etc. That argument cuts both ways!
cut a dash
to have a smart or striking appearance. He cuts a dash in his purple suit.
cut down
1. to cause to fall by cutting. He has cut down the apple tree.
2. to reduce (an amount taken etc). I haven't given up smoking but I'm cutting down.
cut in
to interrupt. She cut in with a remark.
cut it fine
to allow barely enough time, money etc for something that must be done.
cut no ice
to have no effect. This sort of flattery cuts no ice with me.
cut off
1. to interrupt or break a telephone connection. I was cut off in the middle of the telephone call.
2. to separate. They were cut off from the rest of the army.
3. to stop or prevent delivery of. They've cut off our supplies of coal.
cut one's losses
to decide to spend no more money, effort etc on something which is proving unprofitable.
cut one's teeth
to grow one's first teeth. The baby's cutting his first tooth.
cut out
1. to stop working, sometimes because of a safety device. The engines cut out (noun ˈcut-out).
2. to stop. I've cut out smoking.
cut short
1. to make shorter than intended. He cut short his holiday to deal with the crisis.
2. to cause (someone) to stop talking by interrupting them. I tried to apologize but he cut me short.
References in classic literature ?
No wonder the grass grows up between the flags, and cattle are the only hedge- cutters.
The frigate, immediately upon coming to an anchor, got springs on her cables, and with he guns; cast loose and her men at their quarters, lay in the circular basin of Papeete, with her broadside bearing upon the devoted town; while her numerous cutters, hauled in order alongside, were ready to effect a landing, under cover of her batteries.
With a pair of cutters he snipped off the projection which extended through the dial from the external pointer--now the latter might be moved to any point upon the dial without affecting the mechanism below.
And there were the low Paumotus, and the high Marquesas; he saw himself often, now, on board trading schooners or frail little cutters, slipping out at dawn through the reef at Papeete and beginning the long beat through the pearl-atolls to Nukahiva and the Bay of Taiohae, where Tamari, he knew, would kill a pig in honor of his coming, and where Tamari's flower-garlanded daughters would seize his hands and with song and laughter garland him with flowers.
With a favoring breeze cutters could win in through the tortuous and shallow channel, but the schooners lay off and on outside and sent in their small boats.
They sent their revenue cutters and dispatch boots and lighthouse tenders, and they sent their last antiquated cruisers and battleships.
The dawns were heralded by the descent of a chill stillness; the wood- cutters slept, their fires burned low; the snapping of a twig would make you start.
Raddle sobbed) to allow his wife to be treated in this way by a parcel of young cutters and carvers of live people's bodies, that disgraces the lodgings (another sob), and leaving her exposed to all manner of abuse; a base, faint- hearted, timorous wretch, that's afraid to come upstairs, and face the ruffinly creatures--that's afraid--that's afraid to come
Peter could give no very clear account of his transactions with Cutter.
The hovel of a cutter of wood into lengths for burning, was the only house at that end; all else was wall.
Dance stood there, as he said, "like a fish out of water," and all he could do was to dispatch a man to B to warn the cutter.
Provided with more sails than a cutter, and with the wind behind them, they slip over the surface of the prairies with a speed equal if not superior to that of the express trains.