cyberpunk

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cy·ber·punk

 (sī′bər-pŭnk′)
n.
Fast-paced science fiction involving futuristic computer-based societies.

cy′ber·punk′ adj.

cyberpunk

(ˈsaɪbəˌpʌŋk)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) a genre of science fiction that features rebellious computer hackers and is set in a dystopian society integrated by computer networks
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of cyberpunk

cy•ber•punk

(ˈsaɪ bərˌpʌŋk)
n.
1. science fiction featuring extensive human interaction with supercomputers and a punk ambiance.
2. Slang. a computer hacker.
[1980–85; cyber- + punk2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cyberpunk - a programmer who breaks into computer systems in order to steal or change or destroy information as a form of cyber-terrorism
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
coder, computer programmer, programmer, software engineer - a person who designs and writes and tests computer programs
terrorist - a radical who employs terror as a political weapon; usually organizes with other terrorists in small cells; often uses religion as a cover for terrorist activities
2.cyberpunk - a writer of science fiction set in a lawless subculture of an oppressive society dominated by computer technology
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
3.cyberpunk - a genre of fast-paced science fiction involving oppressive futuristic computerized societies
science fiction - literary fantasy involving the imagined impact of science on society
Translations

cyberpunk

[ˈsaɪbəpʌŋk] N (Literat) → ciberpunk m

cyberpunk

[ˈsaɪbərpʌŋk] ncyberpunk m
References in periodicals archive ?
Postmodern, 'hard SF' cyberpunkers Bruce Sterling and Jacques Derrida envision existential scenarios that, while vividly portraying posthuman futures, also try to define the remnant of what is still human that will survive, whose survival we can try to ensure, in that futurescape.
Apart from some SF works, such as Vonnegut's Player Piano and Kornbluth's The Space Merchants, it generally isn't until the cyberpunkers of the mid 1980s and, especially, the postmodernist SF writers of the 1990s such as Kim Stanley Robinson and Octavia Butler that corporations become the focus of dystopian writing.