cimbalom

(redirected from Cymbalum)
Related to Cymbalum: Cimbalom

cimbalom

(ˈtsɪmbələm) or

cymbalom

n
(Instruments) a type of dulcimer, esp of Hungary. See dulcimer1
[C19: Hungarian, from Italian cembalo; see cembalo]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mounier shows how Rabelais's Tiers Livre engages the reader in a coherent narrative universe so different from the lack of narrative cohesiveness found in the Cymbalum mundi.
mora tarda mente cedat; simul ite, sequimini Phrygia ad domum Cybelles, Phrygia ad nemora deae, 20 ubi cymbalum sonat vox, ubi tympana reboant, tibicen ubi canit Phryx curvo grave calamo, ubi capita Maenades vi iaciunt ederigerae, ubi sacra sancta acutis ululatibus agitant, ubi suevit illa divae volitare vaga cohors: 25 quo nos decet citatis celerare tripudiis.
He printed some music editions, such as Calvisius's Tricinia (1603) for the bookseller Jakob Apel; but he was mainly active as a publisher, issuing partbook collections such as Schein's Cymbalum sionium (1615) and Banchetto musicale (1617).
Fruity trumpet and saxophone against accordions and cymbalum giving that fast percussive drive.
They are often very informative: to give one instance among dozens, footnote 1 introduces a very relevant comparison between Rabelais and the Cymbalum mundi (211), which could fruitfully have been explored in the text, especially if some of the less-relevant passages of text had been shortened or omitted.
The style of these pieces is similar to those in the Cymbalum sionium that Schein issued in Leipzig in i615.
There's the speed of the music for a start, a blistering pace set up by the cymbalum (a kind of giant hammered dulcimer) and bass, and laid over with ear-defying virtuosity by violins and accordions, flute and clarinet.
Lestringant is also a man of strong opinions, which he does not hesitate to express in passing; he disapproves of Duval's analysis of Rabelais's Fourth Book (257), and rejects the attribution of the Fifth Book to Rabelais (289) and that of the Cymbalum Mundi to Bonaventure Des Periers (274).
In three very long chapters, Max Gauna surveys the essentially Rationalist-Epicurean dissident tradition of unbelief in the literature and cultural-ideological history from antiquity to the early Renaissance, and then analyzes its "upwellings" or resurgent qualities in the Cymbalum Mundi, usually attributed to Bonaventure des Periers, and in Jacques Tahureau's Dialogues.
In the case of the highly enigmatic Cymbalum Mundi, Gauna's thesis requires that he challenge prevailing views of this work: those oriented, to one degree or another, toward Christian interpretation as put forth by V.