cytosine

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Related to Cytosine nucleotides: thymine nucleotide

cy·to·sine

 (sī′tə-sēn′)
n. Abbr. C
A pyrimidine base, C4H5N3O, that is the constituent of DNA and RNA involved in base-pairing with guanine.

[cyt(o)- + (rib)os(e) + -ine.]

cytosine

(ˈsaɪtəsɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a white crystalline pyrimidine occurring in nucleic acids; 6-amino-2-hydroxy pyrimidine. Formula: C4H5N3O. See also DNA, RNA

cy•to•sine

(ˈsaɪ təˌsin, -ˌzin, -sɪn)

n.
a pyrimidine base, C4H5N3O, that is one of the fundamental components of DNA and RNA, in which it forms a base pair with guanine. Symbol: C
[< German Cytosin (1894); see cyto-, -ose2, -ine2]

cy·to·sine

(sī′tə-sēn′)
A base that is a component of DNA and RNA, forming a base pair with guanine.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cytosine - a base found in DNA and RNA and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with guanine
deoxyribonucleic acid, desoxyribonucleic acid, DNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information; "DNA is the king of molecules"
ribonucleic acid, RNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer of nucleotides found in the nucleus but mainly in the cytoplasm of a cell where it is associated with microsomes; it transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm and controls certain chemical processes in the cell; "ribonucleic acid is the genetic material of some viruses"
pyrimidine - any of several basic compounds derived from pyrimidine
Translations
Cytosin
cytosine
cytozyna
References in periodicals archive ?
The high content of guanine and cytosine nucleotides is characteristic of mammalian genes, especially with relatively short introns.
Through a series of transformations involving electrons, carbon-containing molecules and exposure to ultraviolet light, the researchers generated two of the four building blocks of RNA: uracil and cytosine nucleotides.
During development in mammals, chemical tags called methyl groups are added to certain cytosine nucleotides in the DNA, which affects how nearby genes are expressed.