Czechoslovakia

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Related to Czechoslovaks: Czechoslovakians

Czech·o·slo·va·ki·a

 (chĕk′ə-slə-vä′kē-ə, -slō-)
A former country of central Europe. It was formed in 1918 from Czech- and Slovak-speaking territories of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Communists gained control of the government after World War II and stayed in power until late 1989 when demands for democratic political reform forced Communist leaders to resign. In 1993 the country split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Czech′o·slo′vak, Czech′o·slo·va′ki·an adj. & n.

Czechoslovakia

(ˌtʃɛkəʊsləʊˈvækɪə)
n
(Placename) a former republic in central Europe: formed after the defeat of Austria-Hungary (1918) as a nation of Czechs in Bohemia and Moravia and Slovaks in Slovakia; occupied by Germany from 1939 until its liberation by the Soviet Union in 1945; became a people's republic under the Communists in 1948; invaded by Warsaw Pact troops in 1968, ending Dubček's attempt to liberalize communism; in 1989 popular unrest led to the resignation of the politburo and the formation of a non-Communist government. It consisted of two federal republics, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, which separated in 1993. Czech name: Československo See also Czech Republic, Slovakia

Czech•o•slo•va•ki•a

(ˌtʃɛk ə sləˈvɑ ki ə, -ˈvæk i ə)

n.
a former republic in central Europe: formed after World War I; comprised Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, and part of Silesia: a federal republic 1968–92. 49,383 sq. mi. (127,903 sq. km). Cap.: Prague.
Formerly (1990–92), Czech′ and Slo′vak Fed′erative Repub′lic; (1948–89), Czech′oslo′vak So′cialist Repub′lic.
Czech`o•slo•va′ki•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Czechoslovakia - a former republic in central EuropeCzechoslovakia - a former republic in central Europe; divided into Czech Republic and Slovakia in 1993
Danau, Danube, Danube River - the 2nd longest European river (after the Volga); flows from southwestern Germany to the Black Sea; "Vienna, Budapest, and Belgrade are on the banks of the Danube"
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Czechoslovak, Czechoslovakian, Czech - a native or inhabitant of the former republic of Czechoslovakia
Translations
Československo
Tšekkoslovakia
Čehoslovačka
チェコスロバキア
Czechosłowacja
Tjeckoslovakien

Czechoslovakia

[ˈtʃekəʊsləˈvækɪə] N (Hist) → Checoslovaquia f

Czechoslovakia

[ˌtʃɛkəʊsləʊˈvækiə] nTchécoslovaquie f

Czechoslovakia

n (Hist) → die Tschechoslowakei

Czechoslovakia

[ˈtʃɛkəʊsləˈvækɪə] nCecoslovacchia
References in periodicals archive ?
13) The first contacts between the Poles and Czechoslovaks also revealed underlying tensions over the issue of Teschen Silesia as well as a divergence in the two countries' attitudes toward the USSR.
Our Winged Lion is a tribute to the Czechoslovaks who simply wouldn't allow themselves to be oppressed.
This is the necessary studies for the client to ensure the fire resistance of the following works: Arch West Perrache (VOP), Tunnel of Czechoslovaks (TCH), Tunnel Street Terme (TRT) Drop-off Part-Dieu (DMPD).
Therefore, discussions were held with the Soviets and Czechoslovaks, increasing from 1951 onwards, but with little initial success.
Last night tens of thousands of Czechoslovaks celebrated at an outdoor ball held in central Prague's Old Town Square and many danced to Slovak and Moravian folk tunes.
Charter 77 was a petition signed by Czechoslovaks who stood in opposition to the communist regime in the country during the period of so-called normalisation.
We Czechoslovaks, on the other hand, had a "people's democracy;" socialism was still under construction.
In May 1942, Heydrich's car was attacked by two young Czechoslovaks in the capital, Prague.
In contrast, first generation Poles and Czechoslovaks moved disproportionately towards rural areas where they labored in agriculture or in small-scale industry.
If state-owned assets Sad been privatized in accordance with the Commercial Code, as happened in most developed market economies such as Great Britain, privatization would have never been possible, because Czechoslovaks were not merely dealing with sales of companies to private businesses, but were trying to change the overall economic structure of the country.
The Czechoslovaks, those charmingly peaceful revolutionaries who did not step in the flower beds, decided after the fall of communism to tar and feather fellow citizens whose names showed up on secret police lists of informers.
Our intention was to help establish and support a genuine bioethics community in Eastern Europe, so as to strengthen the individual efforts of these Hungarians, Poles, Czechoslovaks, Bulgarians, Yugoslavs, East Germans, and Soviets.