d'Alembert's principle


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d'Alembert's principle

n
(General Physics) physics the principle that for a moving body the external forces are in equilibrium with the inertial forces; a generalization of Newton's third law of motion
[C18: named after Jean Le Rond d'Alembert (1717–83), French mathematician, physicist, and rationalist philosopher]
References in periodicals archive ?
The simplest way to illustrate this is through the character of Pfitz, who appears in various forms in both the novel of that title and D'Alembert's Principle.
Crumey's approach to fiction begins to make more sense when it is framed in terms of Enlightenment thought, as his adoption of a more explicitly encyclopaedic model in D'Alembert's Principle reveals.
Determine the flexible link's tension strength between bodies 1 and 2 using the d'Alembert's principle (Table 1, No.
A classical approach to closed-chain dynamic modelling is to first consider an equivalent tree-structure, and then to consider system constraints via Lagrange multipliers or d'Alembert's principle [6].
a), the basket shall be isolated and it shall be applied the d'Alembert's principle (figure 6.
A classical method for calculating the dynamic models of closed-chains is to be considered first as an equivalent tree-structure, and then to consider the system constraints by the usage of Lagrange multipliers or d'Alembert's principle (Duffy, 1996).
How can d'Alembert's principle be equivalent to Newton's second law of motion; and what are the essential differences between the formulations of the principle of least work by Euler, Lagrange, and Pierre Louis Moreau de Maupertuis (1698-1759)?