DDT


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DDT

 (dē′dē-tē′)
n.
A contact insecticide, C14H9Cl5, occurring as colorless crystals or a whitish powder, toxic to humans and animals when swallowed or absorbed through the skin. Most uses have been banned in the United States since 1972.

[d(ichloro)d(iphenyl)t(richloroethane).]

DDT

n
(Elements & Compounds) dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane; a colourless odourless substance used as an insecticide. It is toxic to animals and is known to accumulate in the tissues. It is now banned in the UK

DDT

a toxic compound, C14H9Cl5, formerly widely used as an insecticide.
[d(ichloro)d(iphenyl)t(richloroethane)]

DDT

(dē′dē-tē′)
Short for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane. A powerful insecticide that is also poisonous to humans and animals. It remains active in the environment for many years and has been banned in the United States for most uses since 1972.

DDT

Dichloro-diphenol-trichloroethane. A pesticide with dangerous bioconcentration effects that is banned in much of the West, but still used in developing countries.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.DDT - an insecticide that is also toxic to animals and humansDDT - an insecticide that is also toxic to animals and humans; banned in the United States since 1972
pollutant - waste matter that contaminates the water or air or soil
insect powder, insecticide - a chemical used to kill insects
Translations

DDT

N ABBR =dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethaneDDT m

DDT

[ˌdiːdiːˈtiː] n abbr (=dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane) → DDT m

DDT®

abbr of dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane → DDT® nt

DDT

[ˌdiːdiːˈtiː] n abbr =dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethaneD.D.T. m

DDT

V. dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane.
References in periodicals archive ?
This DDT project is vital to both long-distance and commuter trains, so we will try to finish it in 2020 or faster than the previous plan in 2022.
The DDT in debt mutual funds was introduced to reduce the arbitrage between bank fixed deposit and debt funds.
The half-life of DDT in nature is relatively short (just a few days in ocean water according to an EPA study).
2004), the use of DDT for malaria control has contributed to uniquely high DDT exposure in sprayed communities (Aneck-Hahn et al.
Besides that, the degradation of lindane and DDT confirms the feasible use of natural sunlight as the UV source for the photocatalysis process to take place.
To ensure sustaxability of the elimination and conversion, related regulations and standards will be established or revised, and supported by capacity building, to create an enabling policy environment for the phase out of DDT based antifouling paint and promote sustainable alternatives.
According to a study by University of California, Davis, developmental exposure to DDT increases the risk of females later developing metabolic syndrome-a cluster of conditions that include increased body fat, blood glucose, and cholesterol.
Insecticide impregnated and control papers for respective insecticides received from WHO Collaborating Centre at the University of Malaysia, with different diagnostic dosages were used for detection of resistance to DDT (4%), malathion (5%) and deltamethrin (0.
The level of integration between Allinea DDT and Allinea MAP - with one consistent development environment - will be a unique and powerful enabler for HPC software developers.
In 1946, Lucille authored what would prove to be two monumentally important papers: one finding that DDT was toxic to fish and other aquatic life when applied to stagnant waters for mosquito control and another describing a field study of a mouse population in an area treated with DDT.
Rachel Carson's seminal 1962 book, Silent Spring, told the real-life story of how bird populations across the country were suffering as a result of the widespread application of the synthetic pesticide DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), which was being used widely to control mosquitoes and others insects.