designated hitter

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designated hitter

n. Abbr. DH Baseball
A player designated at the start of a game to bat instead of the pitcher in the lineup.

des′ignated hit′ter


n.
a player on a baseball team, selected prior to the game, who substitutes for the pitcher at bat but does not take the field defensively. Abbr.: DH, dh
[1970–75, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.designated hitter - a ballplayer who is designated to bat in place of the pitcher
batsman, batter, hitter, slugger - (baseball) a ballplayer who is batting
References in periodicals archive ?
We agree that watching pitchers come through with clutch hits creates added excitement to the game, but the DH rule, which has been in effect for 44 years in the American League, should not be used to punish players who have excelled at the position.
27) Regardless, the National League still didn't want to adopt the DH rule.
The DH rule has worked equally both ways, even if American Leaguers think it puts them at more of a disadvantage.
But thanks to Commissioner Bud Selig's decision to turn recommendations for on-field matters over to a newly created version of the NFL's Competition Committee, the DH rule could face its first real threat since the American League accepted it permanently for the 1976 season, after a three-year experiment that began as a way to create run scoring and increase attendance.
The variable DH is a dummy equal to one when the DH rule is in effect.
The motivation for the DH rule was to inject more offense into the game after it had fallen to dangerously low levels in the late 60s and early 70s.
59 per 1,000 batters faced in the NL, thereby suggesting that both TWK and GST are correct that the DH rule increases hit batsmen in the AL.
Even though the DH rule has outlasted its intended purpose - inject offense into American League lineups - the players' union balks at any talk of eliminating the stupid thing.
The DH rule eliminates that strategic consideration for one player, affecting both line-up decisions and game tactics for the whole team.
First, likely due to the DH rule, the NL tends to use about, an average, a half of a pitcher more per game per team than the AL.
In his years with the Cardinals, however, Herzog persistently put down the DH rule, especially when speaking before large media turnouts at the All-Star game and postseason events.
GST find that the introduction of the DH rule led to "a 10% to 15% increase in hit batters in the American League relative to the National League" (p.