designated hitter

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designated hitter

n. Abbr. DH Baseball
A player designated at the start of a game to bat instead of the pitcher in the lineup.

des′ignated hit′ter


n.
a player on a baseball team, selected prior to the game, who substitutes for the pitcher at bat but does not take the field defensively. Abbr.: DH, dh
[1970–75, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.designated hitter - a ballplayer who is designated to bat in place of the pitcher
batsman, batter, hitter, slugger - (baseball) a ballplayer who is batting
References in periodicals archive ?
The DH rule has worked equally both ways, even if American Leaguers think it puts them at more of a disadvantage.
But thanks to Commissioner Bud Selig's decision to turn recommendations for on-field matters over to a newly created version of the NFL's Competition Committee, the DH rule could face its first real threat since the American League accepted it permanently for the 1976 season, after a three-year experiment that began as a way to create run scoring and increase attendance.
The variable DH is a dummy equal to one when the DH rule is in effect.
Controlling for all of the above factors, including batter quality, the DH rule dummy explains approximately 60% of this difference.
The motivation for the DH rule was to inject more offense into the game after it had fallen to dangerously low levels in the late 60s and early 70s.
Even though the DH rule has outlasted its intended purpose - inject offense into American League lineups - the players' union balks at any talk of eliminating the stupid thing.
The DH rule eliminates that strategic consideration for one player, affecting both line-up decisions and game tactics for the whole team.
GST find that the introduction of the DH rule led to "a 10% to 15% increase in hit batters in the American League relative to the National League" (p.
The DH rule, which the American League adopted in 1973, stands little chance of being scrapped, but designated hitters could be scrambling for places to play under most realignment plans - even though the owners tried in a three-day meeting at Atlanta last week to get a plan approved and ended up postponing it to Oct.
After controlling for other relevant factors, we found that American League batters had been "plunked" at rates 10% to 15% higher than their National League counterparts in the typical regular baseball season since the DH rule went into effect.
I stood by the DH rule and watch night baseball games at Wrigley Field.
The effect of adopting the DH rule within this framework is straightforward.