dada

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Related to Dadas: Dadaistic

Da·da

or da·da  (dä′dä)
n.
A European artistic and literary movement (1916-1923) that flouted conventional aesthetic and cultural values by producing works marked by nonsense, travesty, and incongruity.

[French dada, hobbyhorse, Dada, of baby-talk origin.]

Da′da·ism n.
Da′da·ist adj. & n.
Da′da·is′tic adj.

Dada

(ˈdɑːdɑː) or

Dadaism

n
(Art Movements) a nihilistic artistic movement of the early 20th century in W Europe and the US, founded on principles of irrationality, incongruity, and irreverence towards accepted aesthetic criteria
[C20: from French, from a children's word for hobbyhorse, the name being arbitrarily chosen]
ˈDadaist n, adj
ˌDadaˈistic adj
ˌDadaˈistically adv

Da•da

(ˈdɑ dɑ)

n.
a movement in early 20th-century art and literature whose exponents challenged established canons of art, thought, and morality through nihilist works and outrageous behavior.
[1915–20; < French: hobby horse, childish reduplication of da giddyap]
da′da•ism, n.
da′da•ist, n., adj.
da`da•is′tic, adj.
da`da•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Dada

(c. 1915–23) An art movement originating in Zurich 1915, Dada (the name chosen at random) rejected accepted aesthetic values and advocated an irrational form of non-art or anti-art. Leading figures included the poet Tristan Tzara and the sculptor Jean Arp.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dada - an informal term for a fatherdada - an informal term for a father; probably derived from baby talk
begetter, father, male parent - a male parent (also used as a term of address to your father); "his father was born in Atlanta"
2.dada - a nihilistic art movement (especially in painting) that flourished in Europe early in the 20th century; based on irrationality and negation of the accepted laws of beauty
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Translations
dadadadaismi
דאדאדאדאיזם
dadadadaïsme

Dada

[ˈdɑːdɑː]
A. Ndada m, dadaísmo m
B. ADJdadaísta

Dada

n (Art) → Dada m
References in periodicals archive ?
The legend of the Baroness continues to grow: a one-person play, The Last of the Red-Hot Dadas, written by Kerry Reid and starring Christina Augello, tours internationally; a recent fashion photo essay in the New York Times Magazine, "My Heart Belongs to Dada," focussed on her life and dress; and Rene Steinke, author of The Fires, is at work on a novel, Holy Skirts, set in Greenwich Village and centered on her life.
Baroness Elsa: Gender, Dada and Everyday Modernity--A Cultural Biography has at least three significant strengths.
DG FIA Sindh Moazam Jah Ansari pertaining to this informed that FIA has contacted Interpol and Red Warrants are issued for Dadas arrest whereas Rs.
Since the country's independence and the opening of the Slovene market in 1990, Dadas has become one of Slovenia's most influential and important businesses.
Initially, the Dadas made several key, business-savvy moves to help secure their store's success.
So, in 1994, the Dadas bid $300,000 to buy a vacant bank located across the street from their store.
The Guide argues that Dada has successfully usurped society (thankfully) more than communism.
Taking Andrei's tour through the century of Dada, results in pleasurable ruin that, by Dada standards, succeeds while failing.
The full service publicity firm has been contracted to implement consumer PR and marketing initiatives for the Dada Supreme footwear range.
For Tunde Dada and his wife, Temi, both Nigeria natives, bringing pieces of the Motherland to American consumers has been a lesson in entrepreneurial risk-taking.