Vietnam

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Vietnam

Vi·et·nam

 (vē-ĕt′näm′, -năm′, vē′ĭt-, vyĕt′-)
A country of southeast Asia in eastern Indochina on the South China Sea. It comprises the historical regions of Tonkin, Annam, and Cochin China, much of which was under Chinese control from the 3rd century bc to the 15th century ad. Portuguese traders arrived in 1535, and the area came under French influence in the mid-19th century as part of French Indochina. After the fall of the French garrison at Dien Bien Phu in 1954, it was partitioned into North Vietnam and South Vietnam. The Vietnam War (1959-1975) grew out of the attempt by Communist Vietcong guerrillas backed by North Vietnam to overthrow the US-supported regime in the south. The South Vietnamese government collapsed in 1975, and the country was reunited in 1976. Hanoi is the capital and Ho Chi Minh City the largest city.

Vietnam

(ˌvjɛtˈnæm) or

Viet Nam

n
(Placename) a republic in SE Asia: an ancient empire, conquered by France in the 19th century; occupied by Japan (1940–45) when the Communist-led Vietminh began resistance operations that were continued against restored French rule after 1945. In 1954 the country was divided along the 17th parallel, establishing North Vietnam (under the Vietminh) and South Vietnam (under French control), the latter becoming the independent Republic of Vietnam in 1955. From 1959 the country was dominated by war between the Communist Vietcong, supported by North Vietnam, and the South Vietnamese government; increasing numbers of US forces were brought to the aid of the South Vietnamese army until a peace agreement (1973) led to the withdrawal of US troops; further fighting led to the eventual defeat of the South Vietnamese government in March 1975 and in 1976 an elected National Assembly proclaimed the reunification of the country. Official language: Vietnamese. Religion: Buddhist majority. Currency: dong. Capital: Hanoi. Pop: 92 477 857 (2013 est). Area: 331 041 sq km (127 816 sq miles). Official name: Socialist Republic of Vietnam

Vi•et•nam

or Vi•et Nam

(viˌɛtˈnɑm, -ˈnæm, ˌvi ɪt-)

n.
a country in SE Asia, comprising the former states of Annam, Tonkin, and Cochin-China: formerly in French Indochina; divided into North Vietnam and South Vietnam in 1954 and reunified in 1976. 77,311,210; 127,246 sq. mi. (329,565 sq. km). Cap.: Hanoi. Official name, Socialist Republic of Vietnam. Compare North Vietnam, South Vietnam.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Vietnam - a communist state in Indochina on the South China SeaVietnam - a communist state in Indochina on the South China Sea; achieved independence from France in 1945
Dien Bien Phu - the French military base fell after a siege by Vietnam troops that lasted 56 days; ended the involvement of France in Indochina in 1954
Vietnam War, Vietnam - a prolonged war (1954-1975) between the communist armies of North Vietnam who were supported by the Chinese and the armies of South Vietnam who were supported by the United States
ASEAN, Association of Southeast Asian Nations - an association of nations dedicated to economic and political cooperation in southeastern Asia and who joined with the United States to fight against global terrorism
Indochina, Indochinese peninsula - a peninsula of southeastern Asia that includes Myanmar and Cambodia and Laos and Malaysia and Thailand and Vietnam
North Vietnam - a former country in southeastern Asia that existed from 1954 (after the defeat of the French at Dien Bien Phu) until 1975 when South Vietnam collapsed at the end of the Vietnam War
South Vietnam - a former country in southeastern Asia that existed from 1954 (after the defeat of the French at Dien Bien Phu) until 1975 when it was defeated and annexed by North Vietnam
capital of Vietnam, Hanoi - the capital city of Vietnam; located in North Vietnam
Ho Chi Minh City, Saigon - a city in South Vietnam; formerly (as Saigon) it was the capital of French Indochina
Haiphong - a port city in northern Vietnam; industrial center
Annamese, Vietnamese - a native or inhabitant of Vietnam
2.Vietnam - a prolonged war (1954-1975) between the communist armies of North Vietnam who were supported by the Chinese and the armies of South Vietnam who were supported by the United StatesVietnam - a prolonged war (1954-1975) between the communist armies of North Vietnam who were supported by the Chinese and the armies of South Vietnam who were supported by the United States
Annam, Socialist Republic of Vietnam, Viet Nam, Vietnam - a communist state in Indochina on the South China Sea; achieved independence from France in 1945
Translations
فيتنامفِيَتْنام
Виетнам
Vietnam
Vietnam
VjetnamioVjetnamoVjet-Namo
Vietnam
VietnamViêt Nam
Vijetnam
Vietnam
Vietnam
ベトナム
베트남
Vietnam
Vietnam
ประเทศเวียดนาม
nước Việt Nam

Vietnam

Viet Nam [ˈvjetˈnæm] NVietnam m

Vietnam

Viet Nam [ˌvjɛtˈnæm] nVietnam m, Viêt-nam m
in Vietnam → au Vietnam

Vietnam

nVietnam nt

Vietnam

Viet Nam [ˌvjɛtˈnæm] nVietnam m

Vietnam

فِيَتْنام Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam Βιετνάμ Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam Vijetnam Vietnam ベトナム 베트남 Vietnam Vietnam Wietnam Vietnã, Vietname Вьетнам Vietnam ประเทศเวียดนาม Vietnam nước Việt Nam 越南
References in periodicals archive ?
Taylor, followed by contributions from Ambassador Bui Diem, Central Intelligence Organisation member Phan Cong Tarn, diplomat Nguyen Ngoc Bich, Vice Minister of Agriculture Tran Quang Minh, Minister of Trade Nguyen Duc Cuong, Judge and candidate for the Lower House Phan Quang Tue, opposition members of the House, Tran Van Son and Ma Xai (of the People's/Socialist Coalition and the Tan Dai Viet party, respectively), Rear Admiral Ho Van Ky-Thoai, and General Lan Lu.
John Whitmore uses literati chronicles, spirit tales, and monastic biographies to examine the relationship between rulers, Buddhism, and local spirit cults in Dai Viet in eleventh and twelfth century Vietnam.
A man who was close to the non-communist nationalists of the Dai Viet Party (Guillemot 2010, p.
Moreover, managing the Sino-Vietnamese frontier involved the development of relations with many independent ethnic groups, which resided on their respective sides of the imprecise borderline in the rugged mountain region that separated the Dai Viet kingdom from the Chinese empire.
Dai Viet, as a name used repeatedly in numerous works and not just in "some books," presented itself differently depending on whether it spoke to the people within its own domain or externally when dealing with the Middle Kingdom (25).
939: Vietnamese revolt, defeat the Chinese, and set up the independent nation of Dai Viet (Vietnam).
In the opening article, Li Tana sketches the history of the Red River Delta's northeast, heartland of Dai Viet during the first half of the second millennium.
The book's collective studies--the first four on the newly recovered archaeological evidence that substantiates a revisionist understanding of the Neolithic to the tenth-century emergence of an independent Dai Viet from the former Chinese Jiaozhu (Giao Chi) administrative region, the second five representative of the subsequent nine centuries along the common Gulf of Tongking coastline--all focus on long-term human interactions over nation-centered histories, to demonstrate primary-secondary networked geo-political/economic/cultural relationships.
This coastal area had been important to Jiaozhi (one of the names used by China for Vietnam) under Chinese rule (second century BCE to early tenth century CE) as well as independent Dai Viet, whose first capital for 41 years (968-1009 CE) was in Hoa Lif (Ninh Binh province).
Ancient Vietnam covers a long timespan from the first millennium BCE to the end of the fifteenth century CE when the Champa kingdom of Vijaya was conquered by the Dai Viet emperor Le Thanh Tong in 1471.
A second stage would occur in the late fifteenth century with its official integration into Dai Viet historiography, Dai Viet su ky toan that (TT; The complete historical records of the Great Viet), commissioned under the Later Le dynasty.
This hybrid agrarian-commercial orientation may help to explain why, alone among major agrarian states, Majapahit survived the fourteenth-century commercial expansion that weakened Upper Burma, Angkor and Dai Viet.