damnation

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dam·na·tion

 (dăm-nā′shən)
n.
1. The act of damning or the condition of being damned.
2.
a. Condemnation to everlasting punishment; doom.
b. Everlasting punishment.
3. Failure or ruination incurred by adverse criticism.
interj.
Used to express anger or annoyance. See Note at tarnation.

damnation

(dæmˈneɪʃən)
n
1. the act of damning or state of being damned
2. a cause or instance of being damned
interj
an exclamation of anger, disappointment, etc

dam•na•tion

(dæmˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of damning or the state of being damned.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.damnation - the act of damningdamnation - the act of damning      
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
2.damnation - the state of being condemned to eternal punishment in Hell
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
fire and brimstone - (Old Testament) God's means of destroying sinners; "his sermons were full of fire and brimstone"

damnation

noun (Theology) condemnation, damning, sending to hell, consigning to perdition She had a healthy fear of hellfire and eternal damnation.

damnation

noun
A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury:
Archaic: malison.
Translations

damnation

[dæmˈneɪʃən]
A. N (Rel) → perdición f
B. EXCL¡maldición!

damnation

[ˌdæmˈneɪʃən]
n (RELIGION)damnation f
exclmerde!

damnation

n (Eccl) (= act)Verdammung f; (= state of damnation)Verdammnis f
interj (inf)verdammt (inf)

damnation

[dæmˈneɪʃn]
1. n (Rel) → dannazione f
2. excl (old) → dannazione!, diavolo!
References in classic literature ?
They feed and pamper the vermin who are eating away the foundations of the country, and, damn it all, when we put a clear case to them, when we show them men whom we know to be dangerous, they laugh at us and tell us that it isn't our department
Then he raised his hand to his forehead and said, "Oh, damn it all--" which meant something different.
But as I watched it from the front of the house with the audience I thought, 'God damn it, Jerry