Dane

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Dane

 (dān)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Denmark.
2. A person of Danish ancestry.

[Middle English Dan, from Old Norse Danr.]

Dane

(deɪn)
n
1. (Peoples) a native, citizen, or inhabitant of Denmark
2. (Peoples) any of the Vikings who invaded England from the late 8th to the 11th century ad

Dane

(deɪn)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Denmark.
[before 950; Middle English Dan, Old English Dene (pl.), influenced by Old Norse Danir (pl.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dane - a native or inhabitant of Denmark
Danmark, Denmark, Kingdom of Denmark - a constitutional monarchy in northern Europe; consists of the mainland of Jutland and many islands between the North Sea and the Baltic Sea
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Zealander - a native or inhabitant of Zealand
Translations
Dán
dansker
tanskalainen
Danac
Dani
デンマーク人
덴마크 사람
danskdanska
ชาวเดนมาร์ก
người Đan Mạch

Dane

[deɪn] Ndanés/esa m/f

Dane

[ˈdeɪn] nDanois(e) m/f

Dane

nDäne m, → Dänin f

Dane

[deɪn] ndanese m/f

Dane

دَانْـمَرْكِيّ Dán dansker Däne Δανός danés tanskalainen Danois Danac danese デンマーク人 덴마크 사람 Deen danske Duńczyk dinamarquês датчанин dansk ชาวเดนมาร์ก Danimarkalı người Đan Mạch 丹麦人
References in classic literature ?
Unlike the Danes, these Orientals do not demand the obsequious homage of lowered top-sails from the endless procession of ships before the wind, which for centuries past, by night and by day, have passed between the islands of Sumatra and Java, freighted with the costliest cargoes of the east.
There are only six nations in Europe that make a fair showing--the Germans, British, Swedish, Danes, Norwegians, and Swiss.
Right over the town is the ruin of Whitby Abbey, which was sacked by the Danes, and which is the scene of part of "Marmion," where the girl was built up in the wall.
The fishermen began to mingle with the crowd about the town-hall doors - blue-jowled Portuguese, their women bare-headed or shawled for the most part; clear-eyed Nova Scotians, and men of the Maritime Provinces; French, Italians, Swedes, and Danes, with outside crews of coasting schooners; and everywhere women in black, who saluted one another with a gloomy pride, for this was their day of great days.
With such a centre, already known and organised, we can easily see that each fresh wave of invasion--the Angles, the Saxons, the Danes, and the Normans--found it a desirable possession and so ensured its upholding.
Not that I know much of ancient Danes, though I knew a modern Dane who did me out of ten pounds; but I remember once seeing a picture of some of those gentry, who, I take it, were a kind of white Zulus.
Just past the weir (going up) is Danes' Field, where the invading Danes once encamped, during their march to Gloucestershire; and a little further still, nestling by a sweet corner of the stream, is what is left of Medmenham Abbey.
HROTHGAR, King of the Spear Danes, was a mighty man in war, and when he had fought and conquered much, he bethought him that he would build a great and splendid hall, wherein he might feast and be glad with his people.
For a hundred years, throughout the ninth century, the Danes, appearing with unwearied persistence, repeatedly ravaged and plundered England, and they finally made complete conquest of Northumbria, destroyed all the churches and monasteries, and almost completely extinguished learning.
But Jones, as well as Partridge, was an entire stranger in London; and as he happened to arrive first in a quarter of the town, the inhabitants of which have very little intercourse with the householders of Hanover or Grosvenor-square (for he entered through Gray's-inn-lane), so he rambled about some time before he could even find his way to those happy mansions where fortune segregates from the vulgar those magnanimous heroes, the descendants of antient Britons, Saxons, or Danes, whose ancestors, being born in better days, by sundry kinds of merit, have entailed riches and honour on their posterity.
Helen, with her mouth full, cried: "And that's the man who beat the Austrians, and the Danes, and the French, and who beat the Germans that were inside himself.
The Danes held the camp and the slope where we are standing--the whole crown of the hill, in fact.