Taoism

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Related to Daoist: Confucius, Taoism

Tao·ism

 (dou′ĭz′əm, tou′-) also Dao·ism (dou′-)
n.
A principal philosophy and system of religion of China that is based on writings attributed to Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, and others, and advocates conforming one's behavior and thought to the Tao.

Tao′ist n.
Tao·is′tic adj.

Taoism

(ˈtaʊɪzəm)
n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) the philosophy of Lao Zi that advocates a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
2. (Other Non-Christian Religions) a popular Chinese system of religion and philosophy claiming to be teachings of Lao Zi but also incorporating pantheism and sorcery
ˈTaoist n, adj
Taoˈistic adj

Tao•ism

(ˈdaʊ ɪz əm, ˈtaʊ-)

n.
1. a Chinese philosophic tradition founded by Lao-tzu, advocating a life of simplicity and naturalness and of noninterference with the course of natural events, in order to attain a happy existence in harmony with the Tao.
2. a pantheistic religion based on this tradition, whose practitioners seek longevity and immortality.
[1830–40]
Tao′ist, n., adj.
Tao•is′tic, adj.

Taoism

1. a philosophical system evolved by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu, especially its advocacy of a simple and natural life and of noninterference with the course of natural events in order to have a happy existence in harmony with the Tao.
2. a popular Chinese religion, purporting to be based on the principles of Lao-tzu, but actually an eclectic polytheism characterized by superstition, alchemy, divination, and magic. Also called Hsüan Chiao.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Taoism - a Chinese sect claiming to follow the teaching of Lao-tzu but incorporating pantheism and sorcery in addition to TaoismTaoism - a Chinese sect claiming to follow the teaching of Lao-tzu but incorporating pantheism and sorcery in addition to Taoism
religious order, religious sect, sect - a subdivision of a larger religious group
Tao, Taoist - an adherent of any branch of Taoism
2.Taoism - religion adhering to the teaching of Lao-tzu
Daoism, Taoism - philosophical system developed by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu advocating a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
organized religion, religion, faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
Tao, Taoist - an adherent of any branch of Taoism
3.Taoism - popular Chinese philosophical system based in teachings of Lao-tzu but characterized by a pantheism of many gods and the practices of alchemy and divination and magic
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
4.Taoism - philosophical system developed by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu advocating a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Tao - the ultimate principle of the universe
Taoism - religion adhering to the teaching of Lao-tzu
Translations
DaoismusTaoismus
daoizamtaoizam
taoizmus
taoizm

Taoism

[ˈtaʊɪzəm] Ntaoísmo m

Taoism

nTaoismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Their tastes sparked an innovative period, particularly a preference for landscape and narrative decoration, as seen on the 'elephant leg' vase painted with the Daoist subject, Zhong Kui the demon queller (Fig.
There are also Buddhist, Daoist or Confucian carvings in landscapes similar to those where rock art is found outside of the 'cradle of civilisation'.
The formal religious organizations were also popular in the Song and Yuan, because by constructing a Buddhist or Daoist cloister or chapel and donating landed properties to it, a kinship group was able to evade labor service charges and have their ancestors looked after.
Lam's chapter on Chinese value systems is helpful for understanding how Confucian, Daoist, Buddhist and Christian attitudes affect attitudes towards gambling.
Yang presents Neigong: Martial Qigong for Internal Power, a two-DVD set designed to teach the viewer about the traditional Chinese art of neigong (which literally translates to "internal skill"), a practice that involves coordinating movement and breathing and applying Daoist and Buddhist techniques to cultivate and store one's qi (energy) as well as maximize circulation.
I am using the notion of 'epistemological chaos' partially as a provocation, but not entirely: after all, notions of 'chaos' and 'disorder' in various forms--for example the terms huntun [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], and luan [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]--themselves pervade the Daoist texts (see Girardot 1978; 2009).
That rule is rarely enforced for children of Han Chinese, who, if they have a religion, are mostly Buddhist, Daoist or Christian.
His topics include the psychophysical energy of the Way in Daoist thought, the promise and peril of Toegye's neo-Confucian heterodoxy, the empathetic plurisingularity of the great ultimate in Nongmun's thought, and a neo-Confucian trinity in conversation with Deleuze and Keller.
Focusing on the recent translation of Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy (Of the Event) by Rojcewicz and Vallega-Neu, (2) this paper seeks to explicate Heidegger's version of the clearing and how it differs from the Daoist rendition, illuminate the relationship between nothingness and Being (hereafter beyng), and probe the significance of his call for a leap into the abyss of the clearing if we wish to learn the truth of beyng.
At the same time, however, Li also seems to regard "Buddha" as being another term for Dao (or Way, drawing here on Daoist tradition), or other divinities/Gods.
Deep critiques of the western ideology of nature have been established (Smith, 1998) but this volume moves beyond these critiques and attempts to develop further understandings of nature that are not fixed within a western frame but include perspectives such as Daoist and Buddhist practice.
Beyond Clouds and Waves: Daoist Paintings in the Royal Ontario Museum