Taoism

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Related to Daojiao: Taoism, Daoism

Tao·ism

 (dou′ĭz′əm, tou′-) also Dao·ism (dou′-)
n.
A principal philosophy and system of religion of China that is based on writings attributed to Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, and others, and advocates conforming one's behavior and thought to the Tao.

Tao′ist n.
Tao·is′tic adj.

Taoism

(ˈtaʊɪzəm)
n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) the philosophy of Lao Zi that advocates a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
2. (Other Non-Christian Religions) a popular Chinese system of religion and philosophy claiming to be teachings of Lao Zi but also incorporating pantheism and sorcery
ˈTaoist n, adj
Taoˈistic adj

Tao•ism

(ˈdaʊ ɪz əm, ˈtaʊ-)

n.
1. a Chinese philosophic tradition founded by Lao-tzu, advocating a life of simplicity and naturalness and of noninterference with the course of natural events, in order to attain a happy existence in harmony with the Tao.
2. a pantheistic religion based on this tradition, whose practitioners seek longevity and immortality.
[1830–40]
Tao′ist, n., adj.
Tao•is′tic, adj.

Taoism

1. a philosophical system evolved by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu, especially its advocacy of a simple and natural life and of noninterference with the course of natural events in order to have a happy existence in harmony with the Tao.
2. a popular Chinese religion, purporting to be based on the principles of Lao-tzu, but actually an eclectic polytheism characterized by superstition, alchemy, divination, and magic. Also called Hsüan Chiao.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Taoism - a Chinese sect claiming to follow the teaching of Lao-tzu but incorporating pantheism and sorcery in addition to TaoismTaoism - a Chinese sect claiming to follow the teaching of Lao-tzu but incorporating pantheism and sorcery in addition to Taoism
religious order, religious sect, sect - a subdivision of a larger religious group
Tao, Taoist - an adherent of any branch of Taoism
2.Taoism - religion adhering to the teaching of Lao-tzu
Daoism, Taoism - philosophical system developed by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu advocating a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
organized religion, religion, faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
Tao, Taoist - an adherent of any branch of Taoism
3.Taoism - popular Chinese philosophical system based in teachings of Lao-tzu but characterized by a pantheism of many gods and the practices of alchemy and divination and magic
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
4.Taoism - philosophical system developed by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu advocating a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Tao - the ultimate principle of the universe
Taoism - religion adhering to the teaching of Lao-tzu
Translations
DaoismusTaoismus
daoizamtaoizam
taoizmus
taoizm

Taoism

[ˈtaʊɪzəm] Ntaoísmo m

Taoism

nTaoismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Li Gang "Ye lun Taiping jing chao jia bu ji qi yu Daojiao Shangqing pai zhi guanxi", Daojia wenhua yanjiu 4 (1994): 284-99; Ofuchi Ninji, Dokyo to sono kyoten: Dokyoshi no kenkyu, sono ni (Tokyo: Sobunsha, 1997), 540-44; Kameda Masami "Josei kosei dokun rekki ni okeru shumin shiso ni tsuite: Taiheikyo-sho kobu to no kankei o majiete", Nippon Chugoku gakkaiho 50 (1998): 77-91.
Xiao Li said he was hit twice in the mouth when he talked to a classmate at the school in Daojiao, Guangdong province.
Gray Seaman, Journey to the North: An Ethnohistorical Analysis and Annotated Translation of the Chinese Folk Novel Pei-yuchi (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1987); Ma Shutian, Zhongguo Daojiao zhu shen [Taoist divinities of China] (Beijing: Tuanjie Press, 1996; repr.