Darius III


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Darius III

Died 330 bc.
King of Persia (336-330) who was defeated in several battles by Alexander the Great. His murder by a Bactrian satrap effectively ended the Persian Empire.

Darius III

n
(Biography) died 330 bc, last Achaemenid king of Persia (336–330), who was defeated by Alexander the Great

Darius III


n.
(Codomannus), died 330 B.C., king of Persia 336–330.
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Noun1.Darius III - king of Persia who was defeated by Alexander the GreatDarius III - king of Persia who was defeated by Alexander the Great; his murder effectively ended the Persian Empire (died in 330 BC)
References in periodicals archive ?
The name "Beth Garmai" or "Beth Garme" may be of Syriac origin meaning "the house of bones", thought to refer to bones of slaughtered Achaemenids after a decisive battle between Alexander the Great and Darius III on the plains between the Upper Zab and Diyala river.
Alexander of Macedonia after defeating Darius III in 330 B.
Looting has been a part of war at least since 333BC when Alexander the Great strolled into the tent of King Darius III and helped himself to the vanquished Persian's best tapestries.
331BC: Alexander the Great's Macedonians won a decisive victory over the Persians led by Darius III at the battle of Gaugamela, leading to the downfall of the Persian Empire: Darius was murdered by one of his own aristocrats after the defeat.
Pierre Briant exposes the prevailing Eurocentric view of the Persian Empire and of its rulers, which perpetuated the image of Darius III as a coward, or, at best, a conscientious king disadvantaged by his antagonist's military genius, and the notion that Alexander conquered an empire on the brink of collapse (42-55).
the GreatAAEs triumph over Persian king Darius III at the Battle of Gaugamela, which ultimately led to the demise of the Achaemenid Empire.
Then we turn to Persia with two papers from Pierre Briant: "The Empire of Darius III in Perspective" and "Alexander and the Persian Empire, between 'Decline' and 'Renovation': History and Historiography.