Darwinism


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Dar·win·ism

 (där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.

Darwinism

(ˈdɑːwɪˌnɪzəm) or

Darwinian theory

n
(Biology) the theory of the origin of animal and plant species by evolution through a process of natural selection. Compare Lamarckism See also Neo-Darwinism
ˈDarwinist, ˈDarwinite n, adj
ˌDarwinˈistic adj

Dar•win•ism

(ˈdɑr wəˌnɪz əm)

n.
the Darwinian theory that species originate by descent with slight variation from parent forms through the natural selection of individuals best adapted for survival and reproduction.
[1855–60]
Dar′win•ist, n., adj.
Dar`win•is′tic, adj.

Darwinism

the theory of evolution by natural selection of those species best adapted to survive the struggle for existence. — Darwinian, n., ad).
See also: Evolution
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Darwinism - a theory of organic evolution claiming that new species arise and are perpetuated by natural selectionDarwinism - a theory of organic evolution claiming that new species arise and are perpetuated by natural selection
evolutionism, theory of evolution, theory of organic evolution - (biology) a scientific theory of the origin of species of plants and animals
neo-Darwinism - a modern Darwinian theory that explains new species in terms of genetic mutations
Translations
References in classic literature ?
You have ventured to use the word `speculation' with regard to my statement upon the subject of Darwinism, and I would call your attention to the fact that such a word in such a connection is offensive to a degree.
They consider Darwinism a threat to religious belief and see undermining it as essential to propping up fundamentalist versions of Christianity.
politicians at the turn of the century, schooled in social Darwinism, often referred to Slavs as ``dangerous'' and ``backward.
But thereafter the Darwinism begins to scatter, as when "Kennedy's Executive Office operating methods departed most dramatically from Eisenhower's in the area of foreign affairs" and as when "Johnson left office, American politics was becoming even more intractable for presidential leadership than it had been in the 1940s and 1950s," as well as the Carter to Reagan bump, which illustrates character and style more than instittional evolution.
I signed the Scientific Dissent From Darwinism statement because I am absolutely convinced of the lack of true scientific evidence in favor of Darwinian dogma," said Raul Leguizamon, M.
Yes there is evolution, but not the impossible Darwinism.
What they're attacking is not Darwinism but science.
This heavy-handed approach to housecleaning also leads to some domestic Darwinism - only the strongest germs survive.
In his presentation "Digital Darwinism (or Who Greased the Sides of the Tar Pit?
This is a big victory for the students of Kansas, providing them with full-disclosure of the scientific debate about Darwinism going on between scientists and in the scientific literature, so we're very pleased," said Casey Luskin, program officer for public policy and legal affairs with Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture.
The variety of topics and approaches makes this book an effective and clear illustration of the current status of the many debates about the theological implications of Darwinism, as well as a good primer for further analysis.
Focusing on the importance of the issue to education in the sciences and humanities, especially America's public schools, she examines Darwinism and the neo-Darwinian revolution and applications of Darwin's theories in the social Darwinism and eugenics movements; theistic approaches to evolution; arguments for and responses to creationism and intelligent design; religion, science, the American courts, and key trials; and public schools and religion.