David


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Da·vid

 (dā′vĭd) Died c. 962 bc.
The second king of Judah and Israel. According to the Bible, he slew the Philistine giant Goliath and succeeded Saul as king. He is the reputed author of many of the Psalms.

[Hebrew dāwīd, beloved, kinsman (sense uncertain); see dwd in Semitic roots.]

David

, Saint fl. sixth century ad.
Patron saint of Wales. His shrine at St. David's in southwest Wales was an important place of pilgrimage during the Middle Ages.

David

(ˈdeɪvɪd)
n
1. (Biography) the second king of the Hebrews (about 1000–962 bc), who united Israel as a kingdom with Jerusalem as its capital
2. (Biography) Elizabeth. 1914–92, British cookery writer. Her books include Mediterranean Food (1950) and An Omelette and a Glass of Wine (1984)
3. (Biography) Jacques Louis (ʒɑk lwi). 1748–1825, French neoclassical painter of such works as the Oath of the Horatii (1784), Death of Socrates (1787), and The Intervention of the Sabine Women (1799). He actively supported the French Revolution and became court painter to Napoleon Bonaparte in 1804; banished at the Bourbon restoration
4. (Biography) Saint. 6th century ad, Welsh bishop; patron saint of Wales. Feast day: March 1

Da•vid

(ˈdeɪ vɪd for 1, 2; Fr. daˈvid for 3 )

n.
1. died c970 B.C., the second king of Israel, reigned c1010–c970, successor to Saul.
2. Saint, A.D. c510–601?, Welsh bishop: patron saint of Wales.
3. Jacques Louis, 1748–1825, French painter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.David - patron saint of Wales (circa 520-600)David - patron saint of Wales (circa 520-600)
2.David - French neoclassical painter who actively supported the French Revolution (1748-1825)David - French neoclassical painter who actively supported the French Revolution (1748-1825)
3.David - (Old Testament) the 2nd king of the Israelites; as a young shepherd he fought Goliath (a giant Philistine warrior) and killed him by hitting him in the head with a stone flung from a sling; he united Israel with Jerusalem as its capital; many of the Psalms are attributed to David (circa 1000-962 BC)
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Translations
David
David
David
DaavidTaavettiTaavi
David
Dávid
Davíð
David
Dawid
Dávid
David

David

[ˈdeɪvɪd] NDavid

David

nDavid m

David

[ˈdeɪvɪd] nDavide m
References in classic literature ?
Laurence in the twilight, Laurie, standing in the shadow of the curtain, listened to the little David, whose simple music always quieted his moody spirit, and watched the old man, who sat with his gray head on his hand, thinking tender thoughts of the dead child he had loved so much.
Young David Hardy grew up in the house with this woman and as can well be imagined there was not much joy in his childhood.
Now read me a chapter in "The Prince of the House of David.
I am thankful that, though my boyhood may be said to have been set apart, like the youth of the royal David, for the purposes of music, no syllable of rude verse has ever profaned my lips.
The walls were hung round with tapestry, said to be from the Gobelin looms, and, at all events, representing the Scriptural story of David and Bathsheba, and Nathan the Prophet, in colours still unfaded, but which made the fair woman of the scene almost as grimly picturesque as the woe-denouncing seer.
David playing to Saul could never have shown a finer sense of the occasion.
The solemn light of dawn--the angelic glory of the morning-star--had looked in through the rude window of the shed where Tom was lying; and, as if descending on that star-beam, came the solemn words, "I am the root and offspring of David, and the bright and morning star.
I've read The Lamplighter, and Scottish Chiefs, and Ivanhoe, and The Heir of Redclyffe, and Cora, the Doctor's Wife, and David Copperfield, and The Gold of Chickaree, and Plutarch's Lives, and Thaddeus of Warsaw, and Pilgrim's Progress, and lots more.
DAVID RUGGLES, whose vigi- lance, kindness, and perseverance, I shall never for- get.
It is my opinion the fiddler David must have been an insipid sort of fellow; I like black Bothwell better: to my mind a man is nothing without a spice of the devil in him; and history may say what it will of James Hepburn, but I have a notion, he was just the sort of wild, fierce, bandit hero whom I could have consented to gift with my hand.
She refused to walk out with me any more; she wouldn't draw me my beer; she took up with my fellow-servant, David Crouch.
David Copperfield, I think,' said Miss Betsey; the emphasis referring, perhaps, to my mother's mourning weeds, and her condition.