daymare

daymare

(ˈdeɪˌmɛə)
n
an unpleasant experience one has when not asleep

day•mare

(ˈdeɪˌmɛər)

n.
a distressing experience, similar to a bad dream, occurring while one is awake.
[1730–40; day + (night) mare]
References in classic literature ?
and Miss Murdstone in it, everywhere: a monstrous load that I was obliged to bear, a daymare that there was no possibility of breaking in, a weight that brooded on my wits, and blunted them!
Opinions vary about this satirical fantasy from Alexander Payne, a sci-fi daymare about a world in which it is scientifically possible to reduce yourself to the size of a matchbox.
chains, the daymare of rolling over And then who would water the
His best-known games are Submachine, Daymare Town and 10 Gnomes.
Well, crummy Kyle - ITV's monstrous morning motormouth - delivers a dismal guttertrawling show that you might call a daymare.
If fear simply freezes speech, distress will break out in physical symptoms, in nightmares and daymares.
When we talk about the immorality, the obscenity of nuclear weapons, it is important to remember that this is all part of their cost – all those terrified nights and vivid daymares visited upon an entire generation of children.
I've even been persuaded to act as a reluctant nurse to treat all manner of revolting pet injuries which gave me nightmares ( and daymares too.
Once she is "Disparue" (253), dreams of Dolores fill Humbert's waking life, "constantly and obsessively in my conscious mind during my daymares and insomnias" (254).
The frights of nightmares, daymares and nightmarish literature cannot be dissipated by a bullet, unless the bullet is silver, unless it is invested with magical, that is, delusory, properties.