deaconess

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dea·con·ess

 (dē′kə-nĭs)
n.
1. A laywoman serving as assistant to a Protestant minister.
2. Used as a title prefixed to the surname of such a woman: Deaconess Brown.

deaconess

(ˈdiːkənɪs)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity (in the early church and in some modern Churches) a female member of the laity with duties similar to those of a deacon

dea•con•ess

(ˈdi kə nɪs)

n.
(in certain Protestant churches) a woman belonging to an order dedicated to social services.
[1530–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deaconess - a woman deacon
deacon, Protestant deacon - a Protestant layman who assists the minister
Translations

deaconess

[ˈdiːkənes] Ndiaconisa f

deaconess

nDiakonin f; (= elder)Kirchenälteste f

deaconess

[ˈdiːkənɛs] ndiaconessa
References in periodicals archive ?
Since there was no liturgical reason for the bishop to give the chalice to the deaconess, FitzGerald, Women Deacons, 102, cites a Swedish scholar named Brodd who suggests that it may have been a relic of an earlier practice of deaconesses distributing the Eucharist at the liturgy.
He himself was known to favour women's ordination and at one point seemed prepared to introduce deaconesses into his diocese.
The commission observed that the deaconesses mentioned in the tradition of the early church cannot simply be assimilated to ordained deacons," he says.
Byzantine writings evidence the ordination of women well into the Middle Ages, with some deaconesses serving in monasteries as late as the 11th century.
We're developing our own course, because we can get a lot of information from the deaconesses.
There is also more discussion of the relationship between church offices and the roles of women as widows, deaconesses, and leaders of ascetic communities.
It was soon surrounded by auxiliary institutions, and the deaconesses he trained proved to be significant workers in society in general and also during Germany's wars.
The commission notes that deaconesses in the early tradition of the Church cannot be compared to ordained deacons.
Here Loehe saw a necessary and important ecclesial responsibility: he wanted to prepare these women as deaconesses for "a female Christian service of charity" (7) toward those in need of care, i.
Another development from the circle of women around Christ was that of deaconesses, women engaged in a consecrated way of life, but not ordained, as some people think today.
Deaconesses, including Kristin Wassalik, director of Deaconess Program, Concordia University; Lisa Molotla, Immanuel, Des Plaines; Rogene Lis, Trinity, Roselle; and Dianna Bonfield, Lutheran Church Charities volunteer coordinator, joined O'Day for her installation and the pinning ceremony.