deare


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deare

(dɪə)
n
an act of damage or injury

deare

(dɪə)
n
(Animals) an archaic spelling of deer

deare

(dɪə)
n, adj
an archaic spelling of dear
References in periodicals archive ?
6) John Beaumont, 'An Epitaph Upon my Deare Brother, Francis Beaumont', Bosworth-field: With a Taste of the Variety of Other Poems (London, 1629: STC 1694), M2v.
3) "To my deare and most worthy friend Master Mathew Roydon", in The Shadow of Night: Containing two poeticall Hymnes.
Those included ousted National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, 10 members of the White House Advisory Commission who resigned in protest, Ben Carson's top advisor Shermichael Singleton and White House National Security Council Director Craig Deare - the last of whom were fired for criticizing Trump.
In the 1920's, nearly 30 percent of Americans lived on farms (Kalbacher & DeAre, 1988).
Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie C L; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff.
Her body, late the prison of sad paine, Now the sweet lodge of loue and deare delight: But she faire Lady ouercommen quight Of huge affection, did in pleasure melt, And in sweete rauishment pourd out her spright (45.
Coridon "burnt in" Pastorella's "loue" and experienced a "sweet pleasing payne," causing him to "languish, and his deare life spend," like Mirabella's myriad deceased suitors (ix.
3) When he published Marlowe's unfinished Hero and Leander in 1598, Edmund Blunt wrote in the Epistle Dedicatory: "'Wee thinke not our selves discharged of the dutie wee owe to our friend, when wee have brought the breathlesse bodie to the earth: for albeit the eye there taketh his ever farwell of that beloved object, yet the impression of the man that hath beene deare unto us, living an after life in our memory, there putteth us in mind of farther obsequies due unto the deceased.
So holy in my head, Perfect and light in my deare breast, My doctrine tun'd by Christ, (who is not dead, But lives in me while I do rest) Come people; Aaron's drest.
The brick and stone building featured a tablet over the entrance depicting the Good Samaritan by Liverpool sculptor John Deare.
Adieu delightes, that lulled me asleepe, Adieu my deare, whose loue I bought so deare: Adieu my little Lambes and loued sheepe, Adieu ye Woodes that oft my witnesse were: Adieu good Hobbinol, that was so true, Tell Rosalind, her Colin bids her adieu.
Death is a porte wherby we passe to joye Lyf ys a lake that drowneth all in payne Death is so deare it ceasyth all anoy Lyf is so lewd that all it yelds ys vayne For as by lyf to bondage man was browght Even so by death was Freedome lykewyse wrought.