Debrett


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Debrett

(dəˈbrɛt)
n
(Sociology) a list of the British aristocracy. In full: Debrett's Peerage
[C19: after J. Debrett (c. 1750–1822), London publisher who first issued it]
Translations

Debrett

[dəˈbret] N libro de referencia de la aristocracia del Reino Unido; (loosely) → anuario m de la nobleza

Debrett

n˜ Gotha m
References in classic literature ?
New York took stray noblemen calmly, and even (except in the Struthers set) with a certain distrustful hauteur; but when they presented such credentials as these they were received with an old-fashioned cordiality that they would have been greatly mistaken in ascribing solely to their standing in Debrett.
That blood- red hand of Sir Pitt Crawley's would be in anybody's pocket except his own; and it is with grief and pain, that, as admirers of the British aristocracy, we find ourselves obliged to admit the existence of so many ill qualities in a person whose name is in Debrett.
I shall go through Debrett carefully to-night and draw out a list of all the eligible young ladies.
Rob has been linked to a string of famous women including Katy Perry, 33, since splitting from 30-year-old musician FKA, whose real name is Tahliah Debrett Barnett.
A number of people connected to the University of Southampton have been named in the prestigious Debrett s 500.
He will be visiting FKA twigs, real name Tahliah Debrett Barnett, in Gloucestershire where she will be celebrating Christmas with her mum.
Es britanica, de padre jamaicano y madre hispano-inglesa, y se llama Tahliah Debrett Barnett, aunque se la conoce como FKA Twigs en el mundo de la musica y la danza.
Mary Debrett, Media and Cinema Studies, La Trobe University
But what struck the writer most were his fellow guests: 'I can't write with a Debrett on the table,' he complained.
The guide to the upper echelons of British society began in 1769 when John Debrett published 'The New Peerage: The Present State of the Nobility in England, Scotland and Ireland'.
Martinkus begins his article: In issue 138 of Metro there was a piece by Mary Debrett titled "Reclaiming the Personal as Political', which looked at three documentaries concerning the events in East Timor and that country's transition to independence.
Some six years ago, we set out to do for this species what Margaret Mead did for the natives of Samoa and New Guinea, what Jane Goodall did for the gorillas of central Africa, and what John Debrett did for the English peerage, which, come to think of it, is not that far off from the gorilla lady.