Deccan traps


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Related to Deccan traps: Siberian Traps

Deccan traps

A very large region of thick basaltic rock located in west-central India and associated with one of the largest volcanic eruptions in the history of the earth. The eruption took place approximately 65 million years ago and is thought to have contributed to the extinction of dinosaurs.
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But scientists have also pointed to another culprit: the Deccan Traps in present-day India, one of the largest volcanic provinces in the world, which just happened to be going gangbusters at the time of the extinction event.
In fact, only two eruptions were larger than the one in the Pacific Northwest: the basalt flood of the Siberian Traps and the Deccan Traps.
The schists are metamorphosed formations of Dharwarian shales, the Deccan traps are effusive igneous formations and Bhima formations are sedimentaries of Bhima basin.
Previous studies have shown that while the eruptions in western India's Deccan Traps began a few million years before the extinction event, volcanic activity surged closer to the time of the asteroid collision.
But some experts insist that the real reason for the mass extinction was a surge of volcanic activity in a region of India known as the Deccan Traps.
But some experts insist that the impact was a red herring and the real reason for the mass extinction was a surge of volcanic activity in a region of India known as the Deccan Traps.
The team precisely dated rocks from the Deccan Traps that preserves remnants of one of the largest volcanic eruptions on Earth.
A primeval volcanic range in western India known as the Deccan Traps, which were once three times larger than France, began its main phase of eruptions roughly 250,000 years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene, or K-Pg, extinction event, the researchers report in the journal Science.
Earth has seen few volcanic eruptions of this magnitude, but notable examples include the Deccan Traps, which erupted 65 million years ago and spread in a single eruption 9,000 [km.
Washington, December 9 ( ANI ): Volcanic activity from the Deccan Traps in India, not a meteorite impact, may have killed the dinosaurs, according to a new study.
Drishnaswami through clever use of natural radioactive and radiogenic isotopes and selected elements have been able to investigate the details and determine the time scales of chemical scavenging and solute-particle interactions in the sea and ground waters, sedimentary processes on the sea and lake beds, growth and turnover of ferro-manganese deposits, river-ocean interactions and material transport through estuaries, air-sea gas exchange of CO2 and erosion of the Himalaya and the Deccan Traps on the chemical and isotopic evolution of the oceans and long term global change.
And we don't mean the volcanic eruptions of the Deccan Traps in western India that scientists believe led to the extinction of dinosaurs millions of years ago, but to the two volcanoes in the Andaman Sea -- one of which is now in a state of eruption -- that have the potential of becoming major tourist attractions.