decision tree

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decision tree

n
a treelike diagram illustrating the choices available to a decision maker, each possible decision and its estimated outcome being shown as a separate branch of the tree
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Thus if one class is much larger than another, as is the case with Fickett and TungOs benchmark training sets, decision trees tend to optimize accuracy on the larger class.
Investigations Simplified includes a forms sample appendix that guides you on proper forms to use when performing an investigation, decision trees to assist in determining a course of action, a pocket reference card to help staff in their day-today duties, and more.
It provides immediate access to frequently asked questions (FAQs), decision trees, document management, issue management and escalation, and e-mail management and marketing.
Higher-level AI is the focus here, for developing the believable characters that can learn and express emotions: chapters reveal pathfinding, decision trees, and more systems for creating such believable characters, providing step-by-step creation of a 3D animated character through theory reinforced by exercise.
Unconventional methods like decision trees could also be used in order to estimate the factors of banks' profitability.
The purpose of this study is to investigate correlates of high school dropping out through the use of data mining of existing data sources with decision trees.
5 to microarray-based gene expression data in order to induce decision trees for identification of breast cancer patients.
The FSA found that overall firms selling stakeholders preferred to use their established sales methods, rather than getting people to use decision trees without advice.
It is important to note that decision trees, like data mining techniques, serve only to report to the user, who then makes a final decision regarding action and follow-up.
Decision trees are applied to a wide variety of data-centric applications such as data mining, response modelling, supply chain management and customer profiling, direct mail targeting, telecommunications and credit-card fraud detection and risk management.
But because of men like Herb Kelleher, manufacturers of cocktail napkins have gotten rid of most of the unnecessary graphics and verbiage, leaving as much space as possible for flow charts, graphs, and decision trees.
But, significantly meaningful variables were involved in constructing decision trees for both models.