case law

(redirected from Decisional law)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

case law

n.
The law as established by decisions of courts, especially appellate courts in published opinions.

case law

n
(Law) law established by following judicial decisions given in earlier cases. Compare statute law See also precedent1

case′ law`


n.
law based on judicial decisions rather than legislative action.
[1860–65]

case law

Law based on previous judicial decisions and precedent rather than statutes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.case law - a system of jurisprudence based on judicial precedents rather than statutory laws; "common law originated in the unwritten laws of England and was later applied in the United States"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.case law - (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisionscase law - (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisions
service - (law) the acts performed by an English feudal tenant for the benefit of his lord which formed the consideration for the property granted to him
civil law - the body of laws established by a state or nation for its own regulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearlyestablishedright A right may be clearly established if a general constitutional rule already identified in the decisional law applies with obvious clarity to the specific conduct in question.
It outlines a core canon of decisional law in civil procedure, and constitutional provisions, statutes, and rules, focusing on topics essential to a fundamental knowledge of civil procedure, rather than in-depth coverage.
Back then, there are brand-new trends, like in the trade secrets world driven by a new federal law, the environmental world driven by the new administration, and the class action world driven by new decisional law.
While decisional law imposes closer judicial scrutiny of an arbitrator's determination in a compulsory arbitration proceeding (see Motor Vehicle Accident Indemnification Corp.
He and Sacks did, however, stress the difference between statutory and decisional law, and the fact that the latter arises because of rules of stare decisis, (24) I will argue that an exploration of the origins of decisional law yields a better understanding of some of the issues with which Hart was concerned.
All title searches will be performed under the direct supervision of an attorney in good standing and licensed to practice law in the state of South Carolina, so that the Consultant will not be engaged in the unauthorized practice of law or otherwise operating in a manner inconsistent with state or federal statutory or decisional law.
2014), reprises his 2009 viewpoint on Third District decisional law.
Present within the institutional history of general American decisional law are judicial decisions that rebelled against the orthodoxy of Baker.
For example, the instructions for medical malpractice have been substantially rewritten, and new provisions have been added to the punitive damage instructions to cover additional scenarios and reflect new decisional law.
The doctrine of retroactivity (which is really one of nonretroactivity) prevents these challenges by providing courts with a mechanism to apply some decisional law prospectively, depending on the law at issue and the stage of the litigant's case.