declension

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declension

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de·clen·sion

 (dĭ-klĕn′shən)
n.
1. Linguistics
a. In certain languages, the inflection of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives with respect to categories such as case, number, and gender.
b. A class of words of one language with the same or a similar system of inflections, such as the first declension in Latin.
2. A descending slope; a descent.
3. A decline or decrease; deterioration: "States and empires have their periods of declension" (Laurence Sterne).
4. A deviation, as from a standard or practice.

[Middle English declenson, from Old French declinaison, from Latin dēclīnātiō, dēclīnātiōn-, grammatical declension, declination; see declination.]

de·clen′sion·al adj.

declension

(dɪˈklɛnʃən)
n
1. (Grammar) grammar
a. the inflection of nouns, pronouns, or adjectives for case, number, and gender
b. the complete set of the inflections of such a word: "puella" is a first-declension noun in Latin.
2. a decline or deviation from a standard, belief, etc
3. a downward slope or bend
[C15: from Latin dēclīnātiō, literally: a bending aside, hence variation, inflection; see decline]
deˈclensional adj
deˈclensionally adv

de•clen•sion

(dɪˈklɛn ʃən)

n.
1.
a. the inflection of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives for categories such as case and number.
b. the whole set of inflected forms of such a word, or the recital thereof in a fixed order.
c. a class of such words having similar sets of inflected forms: the Latin second declension.
2. a bending, sloping, or moving downward.
3. deterioration; decline.
[1400–50; < Old French declinaison < Latin dēclīnātiō declination]
de•clen′sion•al, adj.

declension

An inflection or set of inflections for a noun, pronoun, or adjective.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.declension - the inflection of nouns and pronouns and adjectives in Indo-European languages
noun - the word class that can serve as the subject or object of a verb, the object of a preposition, or in apposition
inflection, inflexion - a change in the form of a word (usually by adding a suffix) to indicate a change in its grammatical function
2.declension - process of changing to an inferior state
decline, diminution - change toward something smaller or lower
drop-off, falling off, falloff, slump, slack - a noticeable deterioration in performance or quality; "the team went into a slump"; "a gradual slack in output"; "a drop-off in attendance"; "a falloff in quality"
3.declension - a downward slope or bend
downhill - the downward slope of a hill
incline, slope, side - an elevated geological formation; "he climbed the steep slope"; "the house was built on the side of a mountain"
steep - a steep place (as on a hill)
4.declension - a class of nouns or pronouns or adjectives in Indo-European languages having the same (or very similar) inflectional forms; "the first declension in Latin"
category, class, family - a collection of things sharing a common attribute; "there are two classes of detergents"

declension

noun
Descent to a lower level or condition:
Translations
deklinaceskloňování
taivutus
declinatio
declinare
sklanjatev

declension

[dɪˈklenʃən] N (Ling) → declinación f

declension

n (Gram) → Deklination f

declension

[dɪˈklɛnʃn] n (Gram) → declinazione f
References in classic literature ?
He very soon set down poor Tom as a thoroughly stupid lad; for though by hard labor he could get particular declensions into his brain, anything so abstract as the relation between cases and terminations could by no means get such a lodgment there as to enable him to recognize a chance genitive or dative.
At present, in relation to this demand that he should learn Latin declensions and conjugations, Tom was in a state of as blank unimaginativeness concerning the cause and tendency of his sufferings, as if he had been an innocent shrewmouse imprisoned in the split trunk of an ash-tree in order to cure lameness in cattle.
The thick wood, though the trees were mostly of small girth, threw a heavy shadow, so that the steep declension, in front of which grew the tree behind which the African lurked, was almost in darkness.
As for the grammar, I was getting that up as fast as I could from Ollendorff, and from other sources, but I was enjoying Heine before I well knew a declension or a conjugation.
said Bob, with a sudden declension in his high spirits; for he had been Tim's blood horse all the way from church, and had come home rampant.
On the other hand, languages spoken in just a single mountain valley or village can have gorgeously intricate grammars, full of gender and cases and declensions.
Contract award notice: Realization of two (2) main videos and their declensions (details in the specifications).
It covers the basics: the main declensions, active tenses, and a vocabulary of 275 Latin words, applied to stories in each chapter on topics like the Fall of Troy, the journeys of Aeneas, and the founding of Rome and the early kings.
There was another life beckoning, lurid tales of sexual conquest, all a sight more attractive than the advanced Latin declensions of Form Six.
Chapter 4: Noun cases, five declensions, and dictionary work
Secondly, he presupposes that one may consider the singular nominative representative of the two declensions, to the extent that the expression side of the content distinction he describes concerning gender specification can be characterised simply by the desinences of singular nominative.
Therefore, they employ a synchronic approach, based predominantly on inflectional endings, thus recognizing as-declension, a-declension, an-declension, and minor declensions (2011: 69-145).