decoherence


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decoherence

(ˌdiːkəʊˈhɪərəns)
n
(Atomic Physics) physics the process in which a system's behaviour changes from that which can be explained by quantum mechanics to that which can be explained by classical mechanics
Translations
Dekohärenz
dekoherencija
References in periodicals archive ?
Writing for mature students of chemistry and physics, they discuss such topics as weak-field coherent control, decoherence and its effects on controls, coherent control with quantum light, coherent control with few-cycle pulses, and case studies in optimal control.
9) Nevertheless, the issue of how to interpret the collapse of the wave function is far from settled; two other interpretations are decoherence, focusing on the interaction of the electron with its environment, and many-worlds.
Decoherence normally happens so fast that observers cannot catch it in the act, but it occurs more slowly as temperatures decrease.
Unfortunately, the quality of photons generated from solid-state qubits, including quantum dots, can be low due to decoherence mechanisms within the materials.
Malinovskaya was able to investigate decoherence induced by ultrafast optical frequency combs, which are pulsed electromagnetic waves that measure transitional frequencies in atoms and molecules more accurately than any other tool.
One of the great challenges for scientists seeking to harness the power of quantum computing is controlling or removing quantum decoherence -- the creation of errors in calculations caused by interference from factors such as heat, electromagnetic radiation, and material defects.
4) Decoherence concerns the interaction between the shadowy, uncertain, but rich-in-potentialities quantum level and the macro level, where only some of the potentialities at the quantum level are realized.
The study of quantum decoherence processes in the solid state is necessary both to lay the foundations for next-generation quantum technologies and to answer some fundamental questions.
Decoherence is a popular "explanation" of these effects but these tend to rely on assumptions that are just pushed off to other parts of the analysis [16].
In the course of the development of quantum mechanics it has become clear that the concept of pure states is not sufficient when taking environmental influences causing decoherence effects into account.