deconstruction

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de·con·struc·tion

 (dē′kən-strŭk′shən)
n.
A philosophical movement and theory of literary criticism that questions traditional assumptions about certainty, identity, and truth; asserts that words can only refer to other words; and attempts to demonstrate how statements about any text subvert their own meanings.

de′con·struc′tive adj.
de′con·struc′tion·ism n.
de′con·struc′tion·ist n. & adj.

deconstruction

(ˌdiːkənˈstrʌkʃən)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a technique of literary analysis that regards meaning as resulting from the differences between words rather than their reference to the things they stand for. Different meanings are discovered by taking apart the structure of the language used and exposing the assumption that words have a fixed reference point beyond themselves
ˌdeconˈstructionist n, adj

de•con•struc•tion

(ˌdi kənˈstrʌk ʃən)

n.
1. a theory of textual analysis positing that a text has no stable reference and questioning assumptions about the ability of language to represent reality.
2. a philosophical and critical movement that started in France in the 1960s, holding this theory.
[1970–75; < French]
de`con•struc′tion•ist, n., adj.

deconstruction

Critical interpretation of a text by studying linguistic signs in isolation from other elements such as knowledge of its author and cultural background.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deconstruction - a philosophical theory of criticism (usually of literature or film) that seeks to expose deep-seated contradictions in a work by delving below its surface meaning
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
literature - creative writing of recognized artistic value
Translations

deconstruction

[ˌdiːkənˈstrʌkʃən] Ndeconstrucción f

deconstruction

[ˌdiːkənˈstrʌkʃən] n [text, idea] → déconstruction f
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally Civitarese takes on the postmodernists and deconstructionists, showing that Derrida and Freud have more in common than one might suspect.
Derrida and other deconstructionists have said that the discourse of texts have no fixed centres of meanings leading to constant deferring of an absolute meaning.
Furthermore, given the fact that Derrida in his last days and even today other deconstructionists continue to discuss the possibilities inherent in the apophatic tradition, renewed interest in this Hellenic and Christian tradition of thought is very likely.
Excluded also, in the name of brevity, are movements that don't fit variants of the main line--Post-Modernists, of course, such as Venturi and Gehry (given only a dismissive reference), Deconstructionists and Eisenman (surprisingly), the emergence of the iconic building as an important genre, the variety of green architectures and the whole complexity paradigm of design.
With the advent of the deconstructionists (particularly Michel Foucault, who later died of AIDS contracted on one of his celebrated lecture tours), and then the postmodernists who deny even the possibility of truth, Scruton was squeezed out; "my failure to conceal my conservative beliefs was noticed and disapproved.
0" finds the group of sly, witty deconstructionists re-creating every ounce of adrenalin-pumping excitement generated by the likes of Led Zeppelin, AC/DC and Kiss back in the day to the tune of electronic music.
DeRisi says one of the main obstacles is outdated laws that require deconstructionists to acquire difficult-to-obtain demolition licenses.
With such richly complex observations, Hardman, like Deconstructionists in the Derridean tradition (but with no trumpeting, on his part, of specific loyalties to any literary critical school), shows us just how certain it is that no artifact can reveal only one idea (or at least any one limited angle on one idea).
Of particular note is the chapter on "Literary Games," which attempts to explain in simple terms the viewpoints of New Critics, existentialists, deconstructionists, and postmodernists, something which most guides would not even attempt.
Born in Belgium, de Man wound up at Yale where he emerged as the most celebrated and cerebral of literary deconstructionists.
And did he really imagine we deconstructionists would be unable to see through his apparent proposal to do away with all races over straight courses, and his insistence that racing must be spectator-friendly or it loses all point?
When they teach their classes, the Dinzels become tree tango deconstructionists.