-er

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-er 1

suff.
1.
a. One that performs a specified action: swimmer.
b. One that undergoes or is capable of undergoing a specified action: broiler.
c. One that has: ten-pounder.
d. One that is associated or involved with: banker.
2.
a. Native or resident of: New Yorker.
b. One that is: foreigner.

[Middle English, partly from Old English -ere (from Germanic *-ārjaz, from Latin -ārius, -ary), partly from Anglo-French -er (from Old French -ier, from Latin -ārius) and partly from Old French -ere, -eor; see -or1.]

-er 2

suff.
Used to form the comparative degree of adjectives and adverbs: darker; faster.

[Middle English, from Old English -re, -ra.]

-er

suffix forming nouns
1. a person or thing that performs a specified action: reader; decanter; lighter.
2. a person engaged in a profession, occupation, etc: writer; baker; bootlegger.
3. a native or inhabitant of: islander; Londoner; villager.
4. a person or thing having a certain characteristic: newcomer; double-decker; fiver.
[Old English -ere; related to German -er, Latin -ārius]

-er

suffix
forming the comparative degree of adjectives (deeper, freer, sunnier, etc) and adverbs (faster, slower, etc)
[Old English -rd, -re (adj), -or (adv)]

er

(ə, ər)

interj.
(used to express or represent a pause, hesitation, uncertainty, etc.)

ER

1. efficiency report.
2. emergency room.

Er


Chem. Symbol.
erbium.

-er1

,
a noun-forming suffix, added to nouns to form words designating persons from the object of their occupation or labor (hatter; moonshiner; roofer), or from their place of origin or abode (Icelander; southerner), or designating persons or things from some special characteristic or circumstance (double-decker; fourth-grader; tanker; teenager). When added to verbs, -er1 forms nouns denoting a person, animal or thing that performs or is used in performing the action of the verb ( baker; eye-opener; fertilizer; pointer; teacher).
Compare -ier 1, -yer.
[Middle English -er(e), representing Old English -ere agentive suffix (c. Old High German -āri, Gothic -areis < Germanic *-arjaz < Latin -ārius -ary) and Old English -ware, forming ethnonyms (as Rōmware Romans), c. Old High German -āri < Germanic *-warioz people]

-er2

,
a noun suffix occurring in loanwords from French in the Middle English period, most often names of occupations (butcher; carpenter; grocer; mariner; officer), but also other nouns (corner; danger; primer).
[Middle English < Anglo-French -er, Old French -ier < Latin -ārius, -ārium. compare -ary, -eer, -ier2]

-er3

,
a termination of nouns denoting action or process, occurring orig. and predominantly in loanwords from French or Anglo-French: dinner; rejoinder; remainder.
[< Anglo-French or Old French, orig. infinitive suffix -er, -re]

-er4

,
a suffix regularly used in forming the comparative degree of adjectives: harder; smaller.
[Middle English -er(e), -re, Old English -ra, -re; c. German -er]

-er5

,
a suffix regularly used in forming the comparative degree of adverbs: faster.
[Middle English -er(e), -re, Old English -or; c. Old High German -or]

-er6

,
a formative appearing in verbs having frequentative meaning: flicker; flutter; shiver; shudder.
[Middle English; Old English -r-; c. German -(e)r-]

-er7

,
Chiefly Brit. a suffix that creates informal or jocular mutations of more neutral words, which are typically clipped to a single syllable before application of the suffix, and sometimes subjected to other phonetic alterations: bed-sitter; fresher; rugger; soccer. Compare -ers.
[probably modeled on nonagentive uses of -er1; said to have first become current in University College, Oxford, 1875–80]

E.R.

emergency room.
References in classic literature ?
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way--in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
The opening continues: "We had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all going direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
It was the sweetest of times, it was the bitterest of times, it was the age of zeal, it was the age of caution, it was the epoch of raconteurism, it was the epoch of knowledge, it was the season of Savory, it was the season of Sweet, it was the Spring of hype, it was the Winter of logic, we had a surfeit before us, we had a dearth before us, we were all going direct to health, we were all going the other way--in short, the period was so like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities demanded its embrace, for health or money, in the superlative degree of comparison only .
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
Bentley argues that the simple effort to communicate any beliefs and values across cultural boundaries "almost inevitably entailed a certain amount of syncretism, since the explanation of foreign concepts required some degree of comparison and assimilatation to familiar ideas.
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.